Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Stop Attacks on the Clean Water Act—Sign Petition Today

Waterkeeper Alliance

Access to swimmable, fishable and drinkable waters is a basic human right, and today that right is under attack by big polluters and those in Congress who seek short-term gain at the expense of the health of our communities.

In 1972, 39 years ago, our nation’s waterways were sick. Rivers such as the Cuyahoga and the majestic Hudson were so impacted by toxic pollution that they were literally flammable and would cause serious illness to anyone who came in contact with them, and Lake Erie was declared all but dead. It was time for Congress to act, and they did.

On Oct. 18, 1972, the U.S. Congress passed what some consider the most significant environmental legislation in our nation’s history—the Clean Water Act. Enactment of the Clean Water Act created a simple, yet powerful and effective tool to help address these problems—a federal safety net for water quality that guarantees a minimum level of protection to all Americans, no matter where you live. And for nearly 40 years this approach has been working, and it's time to let Congress know that citizens are standing up for their right to clean water and healthy communities, and we will not let corporate polluters and their cronies in Congress weaken this important and historic legislation.

Join Waterkeeper Alliance and the nearly 200 Waterkeepers across the U.S. in letting Congress know that access to clean water is a fundamental right for all and to oppose the attacks currently being waged on clean water by big polluters.

To sign a petition to the U.S. Senate and U.S. House Committees on Appropriations, click here.

For more information or to find your local Waterkeeper, click here.

—————

Waterkeeper Alliance is a global environmental organization uniting more than 190 Waterkeeper organizations around the world and focusing citizen advocacy on the issues that affect our waterways, from pollution to climate change. Waterkeepers patrol more than 1.5 million square miles of rivers, streams and coastlines in the Americas, Europe, Australia, Asia and Africa.  For more information, visit www.waterkeeper.org.

Change.org is an online advocacy platform that empowers anyone, anywhere to start, join, and win campaigns for social change. Millions of people sign petitions on Change.org each month on thousands of issues, winning campaigns every day to advance change locally and globally.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

polaristest / Flickr / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

By Melissa Kravitz Hoeffner

Over six gallons of water are required to produce one gallon of wine. "Irrigation, sprays, and frost protection all [used in winemaking] require a lot of water," explained winemaker and sommelier Keith Wallace, who's also a professor and the founder of the Wine School of Philadelphia, the largest independent wine school in the U.S. And water waste is just the start of the climate-ruining inefficiencies commonplace in the wine industry. Sustainably speaking, climate change could be problematic for your favorite glass of wine.

Read More Show Less
Pixabay

By Rachael Link, MS, RD

Spinach is a true nutritional powerhouse, as it's rich in vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Pexels

By Jeff Turrentine

From day to day, our public health infrastructure — the people and systems we've put in place to keep populations, as opposed to individuals, healthy — largely goes unnoticed. That's because when it's working well, its success takes the form of utter normalcy.

Read More Show Less
Spring Break vs. COVID19: The Real Impact of Ignoring Social Distancing

By Eoin Higgins

A viral video showing cell phone data collected by location accuracy company X-Mode from spring break partiers potentially spreading the coronavirus around the U.S. has brought up questions of digital privacy even as it shows convincingly the importance of staying home to defeat the disease.

Read More Show Less
Aerial shot top view Garbage trucks unload garbage to a recycle in the vicinity of the city of Bangkok, Thailand. bugto / Moment / Getty Images

German researchers have identified a strain of bacterium that not only breaks down toxic plastic, but also uses it as food to fuel the process, according to The Guardian.

Read More Show Less