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Help Spokane Riverkeeper Raise Funds to Perform Water Quality Tests

Help Spokane Riverkeeper Raise Funds to Perform Water Quality Tests

Spokane Riverkeeper

No $10 for $20 deal or half-off massages here. This is a good, old fashioned donation to your local Spokane Riverkeeper.

That’s right, we’ve teamed up with Groupon Grassroots—the philanthropic arm of Groupon—for a local campaign to fund water quality monitoring efforts on Hangman Creek and the Spokane River, monitoring that will help assist a larger watershed restoration effort being undertaken by Spokane Riverkeeper and other local organizations.

The Spokane Riverkeeper local support campaign is available on the Spokane, Washington Groupon Grassroots page and running through Aug. 14. Utilizing Groupon Grassroots’ collective action model, Groupon subscribers can pledge support for the Spokane Riverkeeper local support initiative in increments of $8, with each $8 providing the ability to run water quality tests of different sections of Hangman Creek and the Spokane River, including tests for phosphates, nitrates, dissolved oxygen, pH, temperature and turbidity. The more we get the more we can do. It’s that simple.

However, our campaign first needs to “tip," meaning we need to hit the magical number of 60 Groupons sold before we can realize any of the money. Once our campaign tips, we not only get that money, but everything else people pledge after that and Groupon will likely throw in a little extra as well. So what do you say, can you spare $8 for a great cause today?

One-hundred percent of the Groupon Grassroots campaign proceeds will be used to provide funding support for water quality monitoring of Hangman Creek and the Spokane River.

If our local support initiative reaches its funding goal, we can begin baseline testing on water quality in Hangman Creek and in the Spokane River. Baseline data is essential in setting up an effective and eventually successful restoration project. We are currently working with The Lands Council, Inland Northwest Land Trust, Trout Unlimited and Spokane Community College to develop a multi-year restoration plan for Hangman Creek, a major tributary of the Spokane River. A restored Hangman Creek is vital to meeting water quality improvement goals of the Spokane River, and baseline data and eventual ongoing water quality testing is critical in determining effective restoration efforts.

An incredible amount of work is underway to clean up and protect the health of the Spokane River, a lot of which we have had a hand in. But one glaring hole in the overall scope of work is the lack of protection and work being done to clean up Hangman Creek. Unchecked development and agriculture and a culture of disregard for stream and shoreline regulations have impaired Hangman Creek to a point where it has become one of the biggest threats to overall Spokane River health. Shorelines need to be rehabilitated, wetlands need to be created and pollution prevention measures need to be put in place before any kind of water quality improvements are to be expected.

Success of this Groupon Grassroots campaign will help us get the ball rolling on this important step down the long road of watershed restoration.

Visit EcoWatch's WATER page for more related news on this topic.

 

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