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Help Break the Silence on Climate Change in Tonight's Debate

Climate

350.org

By Jamie Henn

After 270 minutes of Presidential and Vice Presidential debates, no one has mentioned climate change or global warming. If the candidates don't speak up tonight, this will be the first time since 1988 that climate change hasn't been discussed in a Presidential debate.

Our social media team has whipped up a hard-hitting graphic that you can use to help drive the discussion in the lead up to the debate tonight. The more noise we make online, the more likely it is that the candidates or moderator will make a last minute decision to mention climate and, just as important, that the pundits covering the event will talk about climate change.

Can you raise the volume by sharing this on your social networks?

The silence is unacceptable, after the country broke 17,000 heat records this summer, drought smothered half of the nation's corn crop and millions of acres of the American west went up in smoke. Right now, just miles away from the site of tonight's debate, parts of Miami are underwater due to an unusually high tide—a problem that will only worsen if sea levels continue to rise.

The warning signs can’t be ignored, but our politicians have gone silent. The reason couldn’t be more obvious the fossil fuel industry has spent more than $150 million dollars on this election already, with more on the way. This September alone, ExxonMobil PAC and Koch Industries PAC spent a whopping $200,000 and $354,500 apiece to influence the election.

This afternoon, we're working with our allies to make a last minute push to put climate back on the agenda.

Your action online will be joined with action on the ground, as well: our friends from Forecast the Facts, Friends of the Earth and Energy Action Coalition have been working to break the climate silence in the debates, and there will be a rally at the debate in Florida to call for an end to the silence today.

Visit EcoWatch’s FRACKING page for more related news on this topic.

 

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