Quantcast

Helen Caldicott's 'Nuclear-Free Planet' with Noam Chomsky and Other Great Minds

Energy

The great Dr. Helen Caldicott will present a major symposium on a "Nuclear-Free Planet" in New York City at the New York Academy of Medicine from Feb. 28 - March 1. The gathering will feature some of the world's most important speakers and thinkers on the issue of nuclear war and how to prevent it.

She spoke about it with us at the SOLARTOPIA GREEN POWER & WELLNESS SHOW this week in a live broadcast that you can listen to here:

Dr. Caldicott has been speaking, writing and campaigning against nuclear power and war since she was a teenager living in Australia in the 1950s. A medical doctor and one of the world's leading organizers for a green-powered Earth, she once met with then-President Ronald Reagan for more than an hour, schooling him on the realities of atomic war.

Dr. Caldicott has organized numerous high-powered conferences over the years, but says this may be her last. Among other things, it will feature a special showing of On the Beach, Stanley Kramer's breakthrough masterpiece on atomic war. "That film changed my life," she says, forcing her to face at a young age the realities of what nuclear war could do to all of us.

Dr. Helen Caldicott will present a major symposium on a "Nuclear-Free Planet" in New York City at the New York Academy of Medicine from Feb. 28 - March 1.

Among those speaking at the conference will be Noam Chomsky, Bob Alvarez, Bruce Gagnon and many others. Cost for the two days is $60, which includes lunch.

Dr. Caldicott warns that the chaos in Ukraine now threatens 15 Soviet-built atomic reactors still operating there. She says the death toll from Chernobyl (which is still not fully covered) has climbed to more than a million people, and that the western campaign to "back Putin into a corner" is fraught with global dangers.

The horrors of Fukushima, Chernobyl, Three Mile Island and more should long ago have made it clear to humankind that there's no safe place on this Earth for atomic power, either in the form of reactors or bombs.

The upcoming symposium, she says, will be recorded and archived, and turned into a book like other conferences she's convened. This, she says, may be her last. So don't miss it!

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Will Ohioans Be Forced to Pay the Bill to Keep the Crumbling Davis-Besse Nuke Plant Alive?

Anti-Fracking and No Nukes Activists Join Forces Demanding Renewable Energy Revolution

Still No Solution to Storage of High-Level Radioactive Nuclear Waste

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A new report spotlights a U.N. estimate that at least 275 million people rely on healthy coral reefs. A sea turtle near the Heron Island in the Great Barrier Reef is seen above. THE OCEAN AGENCY / XL CATLIN SEAVIEW SURVEY

By Jessica Corbett

In a new report about how the world's coral reefs face "the combined threats of climate change, pollution, and overfishing" — endangering the future of marine biodiversity — a London-based nonprofit calls for greater global efforts to end the climate crisis and ensure the survival of these vital underwater ecosystems.

Read More
Half of the extracted resources used were sand, clay, gravel and cement, seen above, for building, along with the other minerals that produce fertilizer. Cavan Images / Cavan / Getty Images

The world is using up more and more resources and global recycling is falling. That's the grim takeaway from a new report by the Circle Economy think tank, which found that the world used up more than 110 billion tons, or 100.6 billion metric tons, of natural resources, as Agence France-Presse (AFP) reported.

Read More
Sponsored

By Gero Rueter

Heating with coal, oil and natural gas accounts for around a quarter of global greenhouse gas emissions. But that's something we can change, says Wolfgang Feist, founder of the Passive House Institute in the western German city of Darmstadt.

Read More
Researchers estimate that 142,000 people died due to drug use in 2016. Markus Spiske / Unsplash

By George Citroner

  • Recent research finds that official government figures may be underestimating drug deaths by half.
  • Researchers estimate that 142,000 people died due to drug use in 2016.
  • Drug use decreases life expectancy after age 15 by 1.4 years for men and by just under 1 year for women, on average.

Government records may be severely underreporting how many Americans die from drug use, according to a new study by researchers from the University of Pennsylvania and Georgetown University.

Read More
Water coolers in front of shut-off water fountains at Center School in Stow, MA on Sept. 4, 2019 after elevated levels of PFAS were found in the water. David L. Ryan / The Boston Globe via Getty Images

In a new nationwide assessment of drinking water systems, the Environmental Working Group found that toxic fluorinated chemicals known as PFAS are far more prevalent than previously thought.

Read More