Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Town in Oman Breaks World Record for Hottest Night

Climate
Town in Oman Breaks World Record for Hottest Night
Pixabay

This week, a town in the nation of Oman clocked the highest "low" temperature ever recorded. On June 26, Quriyat's 50,000 residents sweltered through 108.7 degrees Fahrenheit—at night.

That's a new world record for the hottest nighttime temperature over a 24-hour period, Weather Underground reported, citing weather records expert Maximiliano Herrera.


The previous low temperature record for any 24-hour period was 107.4 degrees Fahrenheit at Oman's Khassab Airport on June 27, 2011, Herrera noted.

That Tuesday was a particularly hot day in Quriyat. During daytime, max temperature peaked at 121.6 degrees Fahrenheit, just a few degrees shy of Oman's all-time heat record of 123.4 degrees set last year also in Quriyat on May 30 and at Joba on May 31.

As CNN's senior meteorologist Brandon Miller explained, Quriyat's stunning heat record can be explained by its unique location on the coast of the Gulf of Oman.

"You have the scorching temps coming from the Arabian Peninsula and the warm, humid air from the Gulf of Oman," Miller said. "Where they meet, you get extreme heat index (what the air feels like when you combine the air temp with the humidity) and extremely high overnight lows because the air can't cool down much at night because of the humidity."

Hotter nights are a signature of climate change, meaning global warming could literally make some lose sleep.

In a 2017 paper, Harvard University researchers predicted more restless nights as global temperatures increase. They calculated that by 2050, if temperatures continue to rise as predicted, for every 100 Americans, an extra six nights of sleeplessness can be expected every month.

This might not be a problem for people who can afford air conditioning. But, as the researchers noted, the poor will be harder hit because they are less likely to have air-conditioning or be able to run it.

Hotter nights are also particularly dangerous because they reduce the possibility of relief during heat waves.

The Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn, New York, a polluted nearly 2 mile-long waterway that is an EPA Superfund site. Jonathan Macagba / Moment / Getty Images

Thousands of Superfund sites exist around the U.S., with toxic substances left open, mismanaged and dumped. Despite the high levels of toxicity at these sites, nearly 21 million people live within a mile of one of them, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
The National Weather Service station in Chatham, Massachusetts, near the edge of a cliff at the Monomoy National Wildlife Refuge. Bryce Williams / National Weather Service in Boston / Norton

A weather research station on a bluff overlooking the sea is closing down because of the climate crisis.

Read More Show Less
Trending
Amsterdam is one of the Netherlands' cities which already has "milieuzones," where some types of vehicles are banned. Unsplash / jennieramida

By Douglas Broom

  • If online deliveries continue with fossil-fuel trucks, emissions will increase by a third.
  • So cities in the Netherlands will allow only emission-free delivery vehicles after 2025.
  • The government is giving delivery firms cash help to buy or lease electric vehicles.
  • The bans will save 1 megaton of CO2 every year by 2030.

Cities in the Netherlands want to make their air cleaner by banning fossil fuel delivery vehicles from urban areas from 2025.

Read More Show Less
Protestors stage a demonstration against fracking in California on May 30, 2013 in San Francisco, California. Justin Sullivan / Getty Images

A bill that would have banned fracking in California died in committee Tuesday.

Read More Show Less
EXTREME-PHOTOGRAPHER / E+ / Getty Images

By Brett Wilkins

As world leaders prepare for this November's United Nations Climate Conference in Scotland, a new report from the Cambridge Sustainability Commission reveals that the world's wealthiest 5% were responsible for well over a third of all global emissions growth between 1990 and 2015.

Read More Show Less