Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Town in Oman Breaks World Record for Hottest Night

Climate
Pixabay

This week, a town in the nation of Oman clocked the highest "low" temperature ever recorded. On June 26, Quriyat's 50,000 residents sweltered through 108.7 degrees Fahrenheit—at night.

That's a new world record for the hottest nighttime temperature over a 24-hour period, Weather Underground reported, citing weather records expert Maximiliano Herrera.


The previous low temperature record for any 24-hour period was 107.4 degrees Fahrenheit at Oman's Khassab Airport on June 27, 2011, Herrera noted.

That Tuesday was a particularly hot day in Quriyat. During daytime, max temperature peaked at 121.6 degrees Fahrenheit, just a few degrees shy of Oman's all-time heat record of 123.4 degrees set last year also in Quriyat on May 30 and at Joba on May 31.

As CNN's senior meteorologist Brandon Miller explained, Quriyat's stunning heat record can be explained by its unique location on the coast of the Gulf of Oman.

"You have the scorching temps coming from the Arabian Peninsula and the warm, humid air from the Gulf of Oman," Miller said. "Where they meet, you get extreme heat index (what the air feels like when you combine the air temp with the humidity) and extremely high overnight lows because the air can't cool down much at night because of the humidity."

Hotter nights are a signature of climate change, meaning global warming could literally make some lose sleep.

In a 2017 paper, Harvard University researchers predicted more restless nights as global temperatures increase. They calculated that by 2050, if temperatures continue to rise as predicted, for every 100 Americans, an extra six nights of sleeplessness can be expected every month.

This might not be a problem for people who can afford air conditioning. But, as the researchers noted, the poor will be harder hit because they are less likely to have air-conditioning or be able to run it.

Hotter nights are also particularly dangerous because they reduce the possibility of relief during heat waves.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

The CDC has emphasized that washing hands with soap and water is one of the most effective ways to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Guido Mieth / Moment / Getty Images

The Centers for Disease Control has emphasized that washing hands with soap and water is one of the most effective measures we can take in preventing the spread of COVID-19. However, millions of Americans in some of the most vulnerable communities face the prospect of having their water shut off during the lockdowns, according to The Guardian.

Read More Show Less
A California newt (Taricha torosa) from Napa County, California, USA. Connor Long / CC BY-SA 3.0

Aerial photos of the Sierra Nevada — the long mountain range stretching down the spine of California — showed rust-colored swathes following the state's record-breaking five-year drought that ended in 2016. The 100 million dead trees were one of the most visible examples of the ecological toll the drought had wrought.

Now, a few years later, we're starting to learn about how smaller, less noticeable species were affected.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Disinfectants and cleaners claiming to sanitize against the novel coronavirus have started to flood the market.
Natthawat / Moment / Getty Images

Disinfectants and cleaners claiming to sanitize against the novel coronavirus have started to flood the market, raising concerns for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), which threatened legal recourse against retailers selling unregistered products, according to The New York Times.

Read More Show Less
A customer packs groceries in reusable bags at a NYC supermarket on March 1, 2020. Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/Getty Images

The global coronavirus pandemic has thrown our daily routine into disarray. Billions are housebound, social contact is off-limits and an invisible virus makes up look at the outside world with suspicion. No surprise, then, that sustainability and the climate movement aren't exactly a priority for many these days.

Read More Show Less
Ingredients are displayed for the Old School Pinto Beans from the Decolonize Your Diet cookbook by Luz Calvo and Catriona Rueda Esquibel. Melissa Renwick / Toronto Star via Getty Images

By Molly Matthews Multedo

Livestock farming contributes to global warming, so eating less meat can be better for the climate.

Read More Show Less