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Heartland Institute—Keep Climate Denial out of Our Schools

Climate

The Climate Reality Project

By Maggie L. Fox

Do you think schools should teach our children that climate change isn't real?

Of course not. But the Heartland Institute, an organization known for giving a microphone to climate science deniers, now wants to bring this false message into America's classrooms.

As its President and CEO just admitted, Heartland is writing a "global warming curriculum" that would say climate science isn't settled. Heartland would like to create the appearance of a scientific debate where there is none by having our teachers claim we don't know if humans are changing our climate.

Fortunately, one brave high school student is asking the Heartland Institute to stop. And I hope you will too.

As you know, the science behind climate change is not controversial—it is reality. It is the height of irresponsibility to urge our schools to teach something known to be untrue—just as it is wrong to teach our children that gravity is not real or nicotine is not addictive.

As its own budget documents reveal, the Heartland Institute is funded by oil and coal companies with a financial interest in denying climate science. But I think you'll agree this industry-funded propaganda has no place in our schools.

Corey Husic is a high school student who knows there is no place for a climate denial curriculum in school. He and many others are asking that Heartland immediately "cease and desist" its plan to bring climate denial into our schools. And today, I invite you to sign this petition as well.

Scientists know that climate change is happening, and we are beginning to see the impacts with our own eyes. This debate is a distraction. Deniers are trying to prevent us from engaging in a much more fruitful discussion over what we can do to solve the climate crisis.

We've created a short video to help you learn more about this urgent issue. I encourage you to watch this video now, and sign the petition to keep climate reality in America's science classrooms.

Tell the Heartland Institute to end its plans for a climate denial curriculum by clicking here.

For more information, click here.

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