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23 Healthy New Year’s Resolutions You Can Actually Keep

Health + Wellness
One of the easiest and most sustainable ways to improve overall health is to eat more whole foods. ThitareeSarmkasat / iStock/ Getty Images Plus

By Jillian Kubala

A new year often signifies a fresh start for many people. For some, this means setting health goals, such as losing weight, following a healthier diet, and starting an exercise routine.


However, more often than not, the health and wellness resolutions chosen are highly restrictive and unsustainable, leading most people to break their resolutions within a few weeks. This is why many people make the same resolutions year after year.

To break that cycle, it's important to make resolutions that can not only improve health but also be followed for life.

Here are 23 New Year's resolutions you can actually keep.

1. Eat More Whole Foods

One of the easiest and most sustainable ways to improve overall health is to eat more whole foods.

Whole foods, including vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds, whole grains, and fish, contain a plethora of nutrients that your body needs to function at an optimal level.

Research shows that following a whole-foods-based diet may significantly reduce heart disease risk factors, body weight, and blood sugar levels, as well as decrease your risk of certain diseases, such as type 2 diabetes.

What's more, adding more whole foods to your diet can be done slowly and consistently. For example, if you're not used to eating vegetables, start by adding one serving of your favorite veggie to your diet every day.

2. Sit Less and Move More

Whether it's due to having a sedentary job or simply being inactive, many people sit more than they should. Sitting too much can have negative effects on health. In fact, it may be linked to an increased risk of overall mortality.

Making a resolution to sit less is an easy and attainable resolution that can be tailored to fit your lifestyle.

For example, if you have a desk job that requires long periods of sitting, make a resolution to go for a 15-minute walk at lunch or to get up and walk for 5 minutes every hour.

3. Cut Back on Sweetened Beverages

Cutting back on sweetened beverages is a smart idea considering that sugary drinks are linked to an increased risk of obesity, fatty liver, heart disease, insulin resistance, and cavities in both children and adults.

Though quitting sweetened beverages cold turkey is always an option, gradually minimizing your intake may help you kick your sugary drink habit for good.

4. Get More Quality Sleep

Sleep is an essential part of overall health, and sleep deprivation can lead to serious consequences. For instance, lack of sleep may increase your risk of weight gain, heart disease, and depression.

There are many reasons why people don't get enough sleep, so it's important to focus on your schedule and lifestyle to determine the best ways to improve sleep quantity and quality.

Decreasing screen time before bed, reducing light pollution in your bedroom, cutting back on caffeine, and getting to bed at a reasonable hour are some simple ways to improve sleep hygiene.

5. Find a Physical Activity That You Enjoy

Every New Year, people purchase expensive memberships to gyms, workout studios, and online fitness programs in hopes of shedding excess body fat in the year to come. Though most people start strong, the majority don't make their new routine into a lasting habit.

Still, you can increase the chances of making your fitness resolutions stick. To get started, choose an activity based on enjoyment and whether it fits into your schedule.

For example, taking a half-hour walk, jog, or bike ride before work, or swimming at a gym that's on your way home, are simple and sustainable exercise resolutions.

Then, set an attainable goal, such as planning to walk a few specific days per week instead of aiming for every day.

Making a more realistic goal can enhance the chances of making your new routine last, especially if you're new to working out.

6. Take More 'Me Time' and Practice Self-Care

Taking time for yourself is not selfish. In fact, it's imperative for optimal health and wellbeing. This is especially true for those in caretaker roles, such as parents and healthcare workers.

For people with busy schedules and limited time, making a resolution to engage in self-care may take some planning. However, it's well worth the time investment.

Self-care doesn't have to be elaborate or time consuming. It can simply mean taking a bath every week, attending your favorite weekly yoga class, preparing a healthy meal for yourself, going for a walk in nature, or getting an extra hour of sleep.

7. Cook More Meals at Home

Research shows that people who cook more meals at home have better diet quality and less body fat than people who eat more meals on the go.

In fact, a study in 11,396 adults found that those who ate 5 or more home-cooked meals per week were 28% less likely to be overweight, compared with those who ate fewer than 3 home-cooked meals per week.

Start by making one meal a day, then increase the frequency over time until you're making the majority of your meals and snacks at home.

8. Spend More Time Outside

Spending more time outdoors can improve health by relieving stress, elevating mood, and even lowering blood pressure.

Making a New Year's resolution to spend more time outside every day is a sustainable and healthy goal that can benefit most everyone, no matter where you live.

Taking a walk outside during your lunch break, hiking on weekends, going camping with friends, or simply soaking in the beauty of your backyard or local park are all ways to incorporate nature into your daily routine.

9. Limit Screen Time

Many people depend on their phones and computers for work and entertainment. However, spending too much time on electronic devices — particularly on social media — has been linked to depression, anxiety, and loneliness in some studies.

Setting a resolution to cut back on the time you spend scrolling through social media, watching TV, or playing computer games may help boost your mood and enhance productivity.

10. Try Meditation

Meditation is an evidence-based way to promote mental well-being. It may be particularly helpful for people who have anxiety or depression.

Trying out this practice is a perfect New Year's resolution because there are many ways to meditate, and it's easy to find books, podcasts, and apps that teach you how to start a meditation practice.

11. Rely Less on Convenience Foods

Many people rely on convenience foods, such as packaged chips, cookies, frozen dinners, and fast food, for a quick meal or snack. Though these items may be tasty and readily available, they can have detrimental effects on your health if eaten too often.

For example, frequent fast food intake is associated with poor overall diet quality, obesity, and an increased risk of numerous conditions, including heart disease and diabetes.

To cut back on your consumption of convenience foods, make a resolution to prepare more meals at home using healthy ingredients.

12. Stop Dieting

Chronic dieting is harmful to both physical and mental health. Plus, most people who lose weight through restrictive dieting regain up to two-thirds of the weight lost within 1 year.

Dieting can also make it harder to lose weight in the future.

Rather than setting a New Year's resolution to lose weight by using restrictive measures, such as a fad diet, try a healthier, more sustainable method of weight loss by focusing on increasing physical activity and eating healthier foods.

13. Go Grocery Shopping Regularly

Having a well-stocked pantry and fridge is necessary to prepare healthy, home-cooked meals.

If you're not used to going grocery shopping, make a New Year's resolution to go to the supermarket or farmer's market more regularly to stock up on nutritious ingredients.

Depending on your schedule, it may be helpful to designate one day each week as your day to shop. Ensuring that you have time to buy the groceries you need to make tasty, nourishing meals is a savvy way to improve your diet quality.

14. Use Healthier Household Products

It's obvious that what you put into your body can significantly impact your health. However, what you choose to put onto your body and what products you use in your home matter, too.

Make a New Year's resolution to purchase more natural beauty products, household cleaners, laundry detergents, and personal care products to create a healthier environment for yourself and your family.

15. Add More Produce to Your Diet

Adding more cooked and raw vegetables and fruits to your diet can go a long way towards improving your health in the new year.

Numerous studies have shown that eating a diet rich in produce helps protect against various illnesses, such as diabetes, heart diseases, certain cancers, and obesity, as well as overall mortality.

16. Cut Back on Alcohol

Though alcohol can certainly fit into a healthy diet, imbibing too often can negatively affect your health. What's more, drinking alcohol frequently may keep you from reaching your health and wellness goals.

If you think cutting back on alcohol may be helpful for you, set a reasonable goal to keep yourself on track, such as limiting drinking to weekend nights only or setting a drink limit for the week.

If you need a non-alcoholic beverage idea to replace your usual cocktail of choice, try fruit-infused sparkling water, kombucha, or one of these fun mocktails.

17. Be More Present

Research shows that being more present may improve life satisfaction by decreasing negative thoughts, which may thereby improve psychological health.

Making a New Year's resolution to be more mindful and present may help you feel more content in your everyday life.

Spending less time on your phone, stopping to notice your environment, and listening intently to others are simple ways to be more present.

18. Take a Vacation

Taking a vacation — even a short one — may have significant and immediate positive effects on stress levels and may enhance well-being.

In the new year, make a resolution to take a vacation with friends or family members, or on your own. Whether you travel to an area you've always wanted to visit or simply plan a staycation at home, taking some time for rest and relaxation is important for health.

19. Try a New Hobby

It's common for adults to let once-loved hobbies fall by the wayside as they get older due to busy schedules or lack of motivation.

However, research shows that partaking in a hobby that you love can help you live a longer, healthier life.

Make a resolution to try out a hobby that you've always been interested in — or pick back up a hobby that used to bring you joy.

20. Stop Negative Body Talk

Talking negatively about your body can lead to feelings of body shame. In fact, research shows that engaging in and hearing negative body talk is associated with higher levels of body dissatisfaction and decreased self-esteem in both women and men.

Make a healthy New Year's resolution to engage in positive self-talk regularly and reduce negative body talk. This may not only help improve your relationship with your own body but also encourage others to stop talking negatively about themselves.

21. Visit Your Doctor

Getting examined regularly by your healthcare practitioner is important for many reasons. Having regular blood work and necessary screenings can help spot potential problems before they turn into something more serious.

Though your pace of doctor's visits depends on many things, including the type of medical care, your age, and your medical history, most experts recommend seeing your primary care physician at least once a year for a checkup.

22. Take Care of Your Teeth

Maintaining your oral health is a New Year's resolution idea that can and should be sustained for life.

Brushing and flossing your teeth regularly can help prevent oral conditions like gum disease and bad breath.

What's more, some research suggests that gum disease may be associated with serious health conditions, such as Alzheimer's and heart disease, making oral care all the more important.

In addition to regular brushing and flossing, most dentists recommend a checkup and cleaning at least once a year.

23. Create a Sustainable, Nourishing Diet

You may be making a resolution to eat healthier or lose weight year after year because you're prioritizing short-term changes over long-term health benefits.

Instead of making a plan to follow yet another restrictive fad diet, this New Year, make a resolution to break the dieting cycle and create a sustainable, nourishing eating pattern that works for you.

The healthiest diet is one that's rich in whole, nutrient-dense foods and low in heavily processed, sugary products. A healthy, long-term diet should not only be nutritious but also adaptable, meaning you can follow it for life — no matter the circumstances.

A sustainable eating pattern can be maintained on vacation, during holidays, and at parties because it's unrestrictive and suited to your lifestyle. Check out this beginners' guide to healthy eating to get started.

The Bottom Line

Though most New Year's resolutions are only kept for a short period, the healthy resolutions listed above are sustainable ways to improve your physical and emotional health that can be followed for life.

Creating a healthier relationship with food and taking better care of your body and mind can drastically improve your health in various ways.

This New Year, try out a few of the resolutions in this article to help make this year — and the years that follow — the healthiest and happiest possible.

Reposted with permission from Healthline.
For detailed source information, please see the original story on Healthline.

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