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8 Super Healthy Hummus Recipes You Can Make Right at Home

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8 Super Healthy Hummus Recipes You Can Make Right at Home

By Karen Reed

If you're looking for a delicious, high protein, low-calorie food, hummus is 100 percent the way to go. Made with chickpeas, it's a vegetarian-friendly meat alternative, one that makes a killer dip for chips and veggie sticks and even a filler for your sandwiches.

Here are a few of the reasons you want to eat more hummus:

  • High in fiber: The high fiber content means that you'll be more regular with your bathroom trips and your digestive tract will work better. Hummus is an amazing source of both insoluble and soluble fiber, making it a useful addition to your diet!
  • Heart-smart: Fiber also helps to lower cholesterol levels, which can reduce your risk of heart disease. By eliminating cholesterol, you prevent arterial narrowing and hardening, both of which can cause cracks and clots.
  • Lose weight: The low-calorie content of hummus makes it the perfect diet snack. Break out the veggie sticks, dip and enjoy!
  • Fight cancer: Chickpeas contain saponins, phytic acid and protease inhibitors, all of which can protect your cells from free radical damage and oxidative stress.
  • Promote healthier bones: Hummus is made with tahini, which is sesame seed paste. Sesame seeds are rich in calcium, as are the chickpeas. Together, they provide a lot of the mineral needed for healthier bones.
  • Provide iron: Chickpeas (like all legumes) are an amazing source of iron, which your body uses to produce more red blood cells. Those red blood cells carry oxygen and nutrients, making you healthier overall.
  • Control blood sugar: That's right, hummus can prevent blood sugar spikes, thanks mainly to its high fat and fiber content. You get a slow, steady release of energy thanks to your serving of hummus, even if you eat it with bread.
  • Non-allergenic: Worried about cutting gluten from your diet? How about dairy? Or peanuts? Or eggs? Hummus is a non-allergenic food, especially if you prepare it without tahini (sesame seed paste). It's highly unlikely to cause a negative food reaction!

All pretty epic reasons to eat more hummus, right?

We've come up with some amazing, delicious and low-calorie hummus recipes for you. Try them to make your own awesome hummus at home:

Traditional Hummus

Spicy Chipotle Hummus

Chip N'Dip Hummus

No Oil Hummus

Pesto Hummus

Greek Hummus

Cheesy Beet Hummus

Guacamole Hummus


This article was reposted with permission from our media associate Positive Health Wellness.

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