Quantcast

8 Super Healthy Hummus Recipes You Can Make Right at Home

Popular

By Karen Reed

If you're looking for a delicious, high protein, low-calorie food, hummus is 100 percent the way to go. Made with chickpeas, it's a vegetarian-friendly meat alternative, one that makes a killer dip for chips and veggie sticks and even a filler for your sandwiches.

Here are a few of the reasons you want to eat more hummus:

  • High in fiber: The high fiber content means that you'll be more regular with your bathroom trips and your digestive tract will work better. Hummus is an amazing source of both insoluble and soluble fiber, making it a useful addition to your diet!
  • Heart-smart: Fiber also helps to lower cholesterol levels, which can reduce your risk of heart disease. By eliminating cholesterol, you prevent arterial narrowing and hardening, both of which can cause cracks and clots.
  • Lose weight: The low-calorie content of hummus makes it the perfect diet snack. Break out the veggie sticks, dip and enjoy!
  • Fight cancer: Chickpeas contain saponins, phytic acid and protease inhibitors, all of which can protect your cells from free radical damage and oxidative stress.
  • Promote healthier bones: Hummus is made with tahini, which is sesame seed paste. Sesame seeds are rich in calcium, as are the chickpeas. Together, they provide a lot of the mineral needed for healthier bones.
  • Provide iron: Chickpeas (like all legumes) are an amazing source of iron, which your body uses to produce more red blood cells. Those red blood cells carry oxygen and nutrients, making you healthier overall.
  • Control blood sugar: That's right, hummus can prevent blood sugar spikes, thanks mainly to its high fat and fiber content. You get a slow, steady release of energy thanks to your serving of hummus, even if you eat it with bread.
  • Non-allergenic: Worried about cutting gluten from your diet? How about dairy? Or peanuts? Or eggs? Hummus is a non-allergenic food, especially if you prepare it without tahini (sesame seed paste). It's highly unlikely to cause a negative food reaction!

All pretty epic reasons to eat more hummus, right?

We've come up with some amazing, delicious and low-calorie hummus recipes for you. Try them to make your own awesome hummus at home:

Traditional Hummus

Spicy Chipotle Hummus

Chip N'Dip Hummus

No Oil Hummus

Pesto Hummus

Greek Hummus

Cheesy Beet Hummus

Guacamole Hummus


This article was reposted with permission from our media associate Positive Health Wellness.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Pexels

By Dan Nosowitz

It's no secret that the past few years have been disastrous for the American farming industry.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Gavin Van De Walle, MS, RD

Medium-chain triglyceride (MCT) oil and coconut oil are fats that have risen in popularity alongside the ketogenic, or keto, diet.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Pexels

By Bijal Trivedi

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released a report on Nov. 13 that describes a list of microorganisms that have become resistant to antibiotics and pose a serious threat to public health. Each year these so-called superbugs cause more than 2.8 million infections in the U.S. and kill more than 35,000 people.

Read More Show Less
Rool Paap / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

By Franziska Spritzler, RD, CDE

Inflammation can be good or bad depending on the situation.

Read More Show Less

By Joe Vukovich

Under the guise of responding to consumer complaints that today's energy- and water-efficient dishwashers take too long, the Department of Energy has proposed creating a new class of dishwashers that wouldn't be subject to any water or energy efficiency standards at all. The move would not only undermine three decades of progress for consumers and the environment, it is based on serious distortions of fact regarding today's dishwashers.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored

By Emily Moran

If you have oak trees in your neighborhood, perhaps you've noticed that some years the ground is carpeted with their acorns, and some years there are hardly any. Biologists call this pattern, in which all the oak trees for miles around make either lots of acorns or almost none, "masting."

Read More Show Less

By Catherine Davidson

Tashi Yudon peeks out from behind a net curtain at the rooftops below and lets out a sigh, her breath frosting on the windowpane in front of her.

Some 700 kilometers away in the capital city Delhi, temperatures have yet to dip below 25 degrees Celsius, but in Spiti there is already an atmosphere of impatient expectation as winter settles over the valley.

Read More Show Less

The Dog Aging Project at the University of Washington is looking to recruit 10,000 dogs to study for the next 10 years to see if they can improve the life expectancy of man's best friend and their quality of life, as CNN reported.

Read More Show Less