Quantcast

How Much Daily Activity You Need to Burn off 9 Healthy (But High-Calorie) Foods

Health + Wellness
Todd Porter & Diane Cu

By Luke Doyle, Budget Direct

A healthy lifestyle is fueled by nutrient-rich foods that give your body the energy it needs. But some of these foods come with high calorie counts and the "healthy" label doesn't mean it's okay to consume unlimited amounts of them.


Keep your calorie count in check by moderating your serving size. And for those days when you really need an indulgence? Dial up the activity level to burn off that excess energy.

1. Packaged Fruit and Nut Mix

A favorite of those with an active lifestyle, fruit and nut mix offers fat for sustenance and protein for muscle repair. The varieties are almost endless, but calorie-counters beware: pre-packaged bags are often heavy in calories.

Homemade versions are a delicious and a healthier option—unless you're moving house, in which case you'll burn those calories and then some.

Budget Direct

2. Sultanas (Raisins)

Though essentially just dried-out grapes, the concentration of sugars makes sultanas relatively high in calories compared to their less wrinkled cousins. In fact, you can have twice as many grapes for half the calories.

Or eat a full serving of sultanas and erase the guilt by tidying the house and giving the floor a good mop.

Budget Direct

3. Hummus

A delicious Middle Eastern dip made from chickpeas, garlic, tahini and lemon juice, hummus has a guaranteed place in fridges and on dinner party tables. As delicious as it is, it's also relatively caloric.

But there's good news: if you can't keep it to a couple tablespoons, you can work off those extra calories with some garden landscaping.

Budget Direct

4. Canned Coconut Milk

Coconut milk gives authentic taste to curries and stews and is a delicious non-dairy base for smoothies. But those calories add up quickly.

You can still achieve that creamy texture with a more moderate serving size—or try a nut milk (like almond milk), which has about an eighth of the calories.

Budget Direct

5. Muesli Bar

Muesli bars are marketed as a healthy on-the-go snack, offering protein and fat to fill you up and carbs to keep you moving. But most bars have added sugars and flavoring that pack on the calories.

If you're dealing with between-meal hunger pangs, opt for a handful of raw nuts instead.

Budget Direct

6. Chia Seeds

Chia seeds are one of the latest superfoods to come to prominence—and they're packed with nutrients like fiber and omega-3, which enhances brain and heart health. But they're also pretty heavy in calories.

Counteract this by halving your portion size and sprinkling the seeds on unsweetened smoothies or yogurt.

Budget Direct

7. Rice Cakes

A dieter's staple, rice cakes actually don't offer much in the way of nutrients. Top one with a nutritious spread like all-natural natural nut butter to remedy this issue.

If you're looking for a fun way to burn off rice cake calories, get yourself ready and go for a whirl around a ballroom dance floor!

Budget Direct

8. Almond Butter

This tasty spread is a great peanut alternative and chock full of good fats—but it maintains that high calorie count. Mitigate this by reducing your portion size and spreading it on apple slices, rather than bread or crackers.

9. Quinoa

An increasingly popular base for healthy salads and main dishes, quinoa seems to have taken the place of potatoes and pasta. Despite being a complete protein, it also offers plenty of carbs and calories.

Your lunchtime Mediterranean quinoa salad is the perfect excuse to take your bicycle out for an afternoon spin. Less than an hour will balance the scales for a large portion.

Budget Direct

It's important to remember that "healthy" doesn't mean low-calorie. So while these foods make great additions to your diet, be mindful about how much of them you consume.

Of course, we all have days when moderation goes out the window. Work off the excess calories by ramping up everyday tasks in your routine. Mix and match from the suggestions provided and focus on finding a healthy lifestyle that suits you.

This article was originally published on Budget Direct.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

MStudioImages / E+ / Getty Images

By Jillian Kubala, MS, RD

Backpacking is an exciting way to explore the wilderness or travel to foreign countries on a budget.

Read More Show Less
Tim P. Whitby / 21st Century Fox / Getty Images

The beauty products we put on our skin can have important consequences for our health. Just this March, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warned that some Claire's cosmetics had tested positive for asbestos. But the FDA could only issue a warning, not a recall, because current law does not empower the agency to do so.

Michelle Pfeiffer wants to change that.

The actress and Environmental Working Group (EWG) board member was spotted on Capitol Hill Thursday lobbying lawmakers on behalf of a bill that would increase oversight of the cosmetics industry, The Washington Post reported.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
A protest march against the Line 3 pipeline in St. Paul, Minnesota on May 18, 2018. Fibonacci Blue / CC BY 2.0

By Collin Rees

We know that people power can stop dangerous fossil fuel projects like the proposed Line 3 tar sands oil pipeline in Minnesota, because we've proved it over and over again — and recently we've had two more big wins.

Read More Show Less
Scientists released a study showing that a million species are at risk for extinction, but it was largely ignored by the corporate news media. Danny Perez Photography / Flickr / CC

By Julia Conley

Scientists at the United Nations' intergovernmental body focusing on biodiversity sounded alarms earlier this month with its report on the looming potential extinction of one million species — but few heard their calls, according to a German newspaper report.

Read More Show Less
DoneGood

By Cullen Schwarz

Ethical shopping is a somewhat new phenomenon. We're far more familiar with the "tried and tested" methods of doing good, like donating our money or time.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Pixabay

Summer is fast approaching, which means it's time to stock up on sunscreen to ward off the harmful effects of sun exposure. Not all sunscreens are created equally, however.

Read More Show Less
Mark Wallheiser / Getty Images

The climate crisis is a major concern for American voters with nearly 40 percent reporting the issue will help determine how they cast their ballots in the upcoming 2020 presidential election, according to a report compiled by the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication.

Of more than 1,000 registered voters surveyed on global warming, climate and energy policies, as well as personal and collective action, 38 percent said that a candidate's position on climate change is "very important" when it comes to determining who will win their vote. Overall, democratic candidates are under more pressure to provide green solutions as part of their campaign promises with 64 percent of Democrat voters saying they prioritize the issue compared with just 34 percent of Independents and 12 percent of Republicans.

Read More Show Less
Flooding in Winfield, Missouri this month. Jonathan Rehg / Getty Images

President Donald Trump has agreed to sign a $19.1 billion disaster relief bill that will help Americans still recovering from the flooding, hurricanes and wildfires that have devastated parts of the country in the past two years. Senate Republicans said they struck a deal with the president to approve the measure, despite the fact that it did not include the funding he wanted for the U.S.-Mexican border, CNN reported.

"The U.S. Senate has just approved a 19 Billion Dollar Disaster Relief Bill, with my total approval. Great!" the president tweeted Thursday.

Read More Show Less