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5 Trends in 2017 That Are Going to Be Huge

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For health-minded folks, 2016 will probably go down as the year of acai bowls, mindfulness and yoga festivals. Kale and lemon water also had their moments in the spotlight, as did raw vegan recipes. With the year coming to a close, wellness experts are starting to predict what trends we can look forward to in 2017.

Here are a few of our favorite ideas:

1. Sober Parties

Last summer, booze-free dance parties really came into their own as a source of fun in the conscious community (pregnant ladies everywhere rejoiced too!). In 2017, experts are predicting that the trend will continue to grow.

Daybreaker is one of the companies pioneering this movement. With events in cities all over the world, Daybreakers has hosted sober raves, silent rooftop dance parties (in which everyone gets his or her own pair of headphones) and yoga happy hours.

The benefit of these kinds of events? No one imbibes and everyone has a great time. Most of these events are held in the morning hours, too, so you get a shot of positive energy right before heading into work.

2. Minimalism

Minimalism also saw a lot of buzz in 2016 and it's likely to continue into 2017. In particular, fashion minimalism may replace trends such as thrift store shopping. Instead of buying tons of vintage frocks and shoes, the new outlook toward fashion may simple be "less is more."

Consider the concept of a capsule wardrobe. This idea, pioneered by fashion bloggers and YouTubers, encourages participants to chose 33 wardrobe items per season. This includes pants, shoes, tops, tanks, jackets—literally everything you might need (minus underwear, pajamas and activewear). Because you're limited in inventory, you're forced to choose items that all go well together and suit your everyday needs. This process requires you to think more critically about any fashion choices you do buy, as you need to adhere to the mentality of "one comes in, one goes out." It's basically ultra-efficiency in fashion form.

3. Homemade Bread

What gluten-free eating was to 2016, healthy carbs will be to 2017. Homemade bread is making a big comeback, with health-conscious eaters turning to their own kitchens for healthy sources of starches and carbs.

Healthy whole grain and sourdough breads will be on the rise, as will artisan creations. And to those who haven't made bread at home before, don't worry—you don't actually need a breadmaker to make a fresh homemade loaf.

4. The Ketogenic Diet

While Paleo has enjoyed a hot minute in the spotlight, it will be the Ketogenic diet that consumes our minds next year. While Paleo favors a high-protein approach to eating, the Ketogenic diet is all about healthy fats and only moderate amounts of protein … which means eating a ton of meat is totally off-limits.

Rather, eating Keto involves consuming lots of olive oil, coconut oil, organ meats, free-range eggs, avocados, organic dairy and bone broth. It has demonstrable health benefits, including weight loss, better skin, slowed aging, more energy, blood sugar regulation and reduced risk of dementia.

5. Cooking With Teff

Teff flour is a African grain that is projected to be majorly en vogue next year. It's basically the next quinoa. According to Bob's Red Mill, teff flour is a "nutritional powerhouse" that contains high levels of iron, calcium, magnesium and zinc. It can be made into cakes, breads, polenta and veggie burgers and is naturally gluten-free.

Reposted with permission from our media associate Care2.

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