Quantcast

9 Health Benefits of Cod Liver Oil

Popular
iStock

By Ryan Raman

Cod liver oil is a type of fish oil supplement.

Like regular fish oil, it's high in omega-3 fatty acids, which are linked to many health benefits, including reduced inflammation and lower blood pressure (1, 2).


It also contains vitamins A and D, both of which provide many other health benefits.

Here are nine scientifically supported benefits of cod liver oil.

1. High in Vitamins A and D

Most cod liver oil is extracted from the liver of Atlantic cod.

Cod liver oil has been used for centuries to relieve joint pain and treat rickets, a disease that causes fragile bones in children (3).

Although cod liver oil is a fish oil supplement, it's quite different than regular fish oil.

Regular fish oil is extracted from the tissue of oily fish like tuna, herring, anchovies and mackerel, while cod liver oil is extracted from the livers of cod.

The liver is rich in fat-soluble vitamins like vitamins A and D, which give it an impressive nutrient profile.

One teaspoon (5 ml) of cod liver oil provides the following (4):

  • Calories: 40
  • Fat: 4.5 grams
  • Omega-3 fatty acids: 890 mg
  • Monounsaturated fat: 2.1 grams
  • Saturated fat: 1 gram
  • Polyunsaturated fat: 1 gram
  • Vitamin A: 90 percent of the RDI
  • Vitamin D: 113 percent of the RDI

Cod liver oil is incredibly nutritious, with a single teaspoon providing 90% of your daily requirements for vitamin A and 113 percent of your daily requirements for vitamin D.

Vitamin A has many roles in the body, including maintaining healthy eyes, brain function and skin (5, 6).

Cod liver oil is also one of the best food sources of vitamin D, which has an important role in maintaining healthy bones by regulating calcium absorption (7).

Summary: Cod liver oil is very nutritious and provides nearly all of your daily requirements for vitamins A and D.

Next Page

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

On the Solomon Islands, rats and poachers are the two major threats to critically endangered sea turtles. A group of local women have joined forces to help save the animals from extinction.

Read More
Whale watching (here, off Húsavík, Iceland) may be better for the local economy than whale hunting. Davide Cantelli / Wikimedia / CC BY

By Joe Roman

One of the most important global conservation events of the past year was something that didn't happen. For the first time since 2002, Iceland — one of just three countries that still allow commercial whaling — didn't hunt any whales, even though its government had approved whaling permits in early 2019.

Read More
Sponsored
People participate in a national mile-long march to highlight the push for clean water in Flint Feb. 19, 2016 in Flint, Michigan. Bill Pugliano / Stringer / Getty Images

The Supreme Court made a decision Tuesday that means Flint residents can sue state and local officials over the water crisis that leached lead into their water and resulted in at least 12 deaths.

Read More
One species of walking shark. Mark Erdmann, California Academy of Sciences

Scientists have identified four new species of walking shark in the waters off Australia and New Guinea.

Read More
A new study shows that half of all Arctic warming and corresponding sea-loss during the late 20th century was caused by ozone-depleting substances. Here, icebergs discharged from Greenland's Jakobshavn Glacier. Kevin Krajick / Earth Institute / EurekAlert!

The world awakened to the hole in the ozone layer in 1985, which scientists attributed it to ozone-depleting substances. Two years later, in Montreal, the world agreed to ban the halogen compounds causing the massive hole over Antarctica. Research now shows that those chemicals didn't just cut a hole in the ozone layer, they also warmed up the Arctic.

Read More