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Have the Kochs Had a Change of Heart?

Climate
Have the Kochs Had a Change of Heart?

Phil Radford

A recent study funded in part by the Charles G. Koch Foundation supports existing scientific evidence that global climate change is happening and is primarily caused by humans. The study's lead author, Dr. Richard Muller, was a well-known climate skeptic who was "converted" by his own examination of global temperature data.

Charles Koch and his brother David have funneled more than $61 million to groups that deny the science and seriousness of climate change. Because of this massive effort and the contradictory investment in Dr. Muller's project, which is currently being submitted for formal peer-review, Greenpeace believes it is crucial for Charles Koch to set the record straight. Does Mr. Koch stand with the conclusions of the science he helped fund, or will he continue to finance unscientific political advocacy against global warming solutions?

I make my case to Charles Koch in the following letter:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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