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Harvey Wasserman

Harvey speaks widely on energy, the environment, history, election protection and politics.  He teaches history and cultural and ethnic diversity at two central Ohio colleges, and  is married with five daughters and three grandchildren.

Harvey works for the permanent shutdown of the nuclear power industry and the birth of Solartopia, a democratic and socially just green-powered Earth free of all fossil and nuclear fuels.

He writes regularly for a wide internet readership through solartopia.orgfreepress.org and  nukefree.org, which he edits.  His current radio show, "the Solartopia Green Power Hour," runs at www.TalktainmentRadio.com.

He has an MA from the University of Chicago and a BA from the University of Michigan, both in history, and has authored or co-written a dozen books.  Howard Zinn, Dr. Benjamin Spock, Marianne Williamson, Studs Terkel, Kurt Vonnegut, Bonnie Raitt, Dennis Kucinich and Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., are among those who have introduced or endorsed his books.  With Pete Seeger and David Bernz he co-wrote the "Song for Solartopia" which is featured on the Grammy-winning "Tomorrow's Children" CD.

Harvey went to his first demonstration in 1962, helping to de-segregate a roller rink in Columbus. In 1963 he heard Martin Luther King's "I Have a Dream" speech at the reflecting pool in Washington, and briefly met Dr. King on the Meredith March for civil rights in Grenada, Mississippi, in 1966.

Active in the movement against the war in Vietnam, Harvey marched on the Pentagon in 1967 and the Chicago Democratic Convention in 1968.  He helped found the legendary anti-war Liberation News Service, which was broken up in 1968 by the FBI's COINTELPRO operation.  He then helped found the communal organic Montague Farm in Massachusetts, which became a key launching ground for the 1960s movement against chemical farming.

In 1973 Harvey helped coin the phrase "No Nukes" and helped found the global grassroots movement against atomic energy, for which he has spoken throughout the US, Asia and Europe.  In 1976-8 he helped coordinate mass non-violent demonstrations against reactors being built in Seabrook, New Hampshire.  In 1979 he helped organize the legendary Musicians United for Safe Energy (MUSE) No Nukes Concerts and rally in Madison Square Garden.  He edited the informational booklet that accompanied the gold triple album that emerged.

In 1982 Harvey co-wrote KILLING OUR OWN:  THE DISASTER OF AMERICA'S EXPERIENCE WITH ATOMIC ENERGY, the first major book to assert that people died at Three Mile Island.  In 1990 he became Senior Advisor to Greenpeace USA, for whom he spoke to 350,000 semi-conscious rock fans at Woodstock 2 in 1994.  In Kiev in 1996 he spoked at the tenth anniversary commemoration of the Chernobyl disaster, and then at a rally in Kaliningrad, in the former Soviet Union, where he met with "liquidators" whose lives and health had been sacrificed in the Chernobyl clean-up.

In central Ohio, Harvey co-founded the Great Blue Heron Alliance, which saved 240 acres of land for a wildlife refuge and other grassroots organizations which  forced shut a trash-burning power plant, stopped a regional radioactive waste dump, shut a McDonald’s and saved the city of Bexley’s Jeffrey Park.

In 2004 Harvey joined with Bob Fitrakis to break most of the major stories on the theft of the 2004 presidential election in Ohio.  Called "the Woodward and Bernstein" of election protection by Rev. Jackson Jackson, Fitrakis and Wasserman have published four books on the American art of vote counting and curtailment.

In 2007 Harvey joined with Bonnie Raitt, Jackson Browne and Graham Nash to form NukeFree.org as part of a successful national grassroots campaign to stop $50 billion in loan guarantees to build new reactors.  Harvey now edits the www.nukefree.org website which posts a constant stream of articles on nuclear power and green energy.  He continues  to campaign for a green-powered Earth, against federal funding and all other new nuke boondoggles, and for a system of automatic voter registration and universal hand counted paper ballots---key elements on the road to Solartopia.

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EPA: Perchlorate in Drinking Water Can Harm Fetal Brain Development

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Pursuant to a consent decree with the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is developing drinking water regulations to protect fetuses and young children from perchlorate, a toxic chemical that inhibits the thyroid's ability to make the hormone T4 essential to brain development. The rulemaking is part of a long process that began in 2011 when the agency made a formal determination that Safe Drinking Water Act standards for perchlorate were needed. Under the consent decree, EPA should propose a standard by October 2018.

In the latest step in that process, EPA's scientists released a draft report in September that, at long last, answers questions posed by its Science Advisory Board in 2013: does perchlorate exposure during the first trimester reduce production of T4 in pregnant women with low iodine consumption? Does reduction in maternal T4 levels in these women adversely affect fetal brain development? According to EPA's scientists, the answers are Yes and Yes.

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Trump's 'Hold' on Elephant Trophies May Not Be Enough

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This follows the administration's decision, on Thursday, to allow such imports after finding Zimbabwe's management of its elephant population "enhances the survival of the species" (referred to as a "positive enhancement finding") under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. The announcement reversed the Obama-era suspension on such imports due to finding the opposite: that Zimbabwe was NOT successfully managing its elephant population.

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Between 2003 and 2014 the EPA identified health hazards for 41 chemicals used in fracking, according to a report from the Partnership for Policy Integrity and Earthworks, based on documents obtained through a Freedom of Information Act request. Fracking is the injection of a chemical slurry into drilling sites to free up underground oil and gas deposits. Hazards from the chemicals used included irritation to eyes and skin; harm to the liver, kidney and nervous system; and damage to the developing fetus.

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For the past two years, about 20 public elementary schools in the Florida county have been using "share tables" to great effect, the Orlando Sentinel reported. The program allows kids to place their unwanted food on designated tables so others can eat them. This means the food doesn't have to be thrown out. Instead, fellow students who are still hungry can just grab the food themselves off the tables.

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