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Harvey Wasserman

Harvey speaks widely on energy, the environment, history, election protection and politics.  He teaches history and cultural and ethnic diversity at two central Ohio colleges, and  is married with five daughters and three grandchildren.

Harvey works for the permanent shutdown of the nuclear power industry and the birth of Solartopia, a democratic and socially just green-powered Earth free of all fossil and nuclear fuels.

He writes regularly for a wide internet readership through solartopia.orgfreepress.org and  nukefree.org, which he edits.  His current radio show, "the Solartopia Green Power Hour," runs at www.TalktainmentRadio.com.

He has an MA from the University of Chicago and a BA from the University of Michigan, both in history, and has authored or co-written a dozen books.  Howard Zinn, Dr. Benjamin Spock, Marianne Williamson, Studs Terkel, Kurt Vonnegut, Bonnie Raitt, Dennis Kucinich and Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., are among those who have introduced or endorsed his books.  With Pete Seeger and David Bernz he co-wrote the "Song for Solartopia" which is featured on the Grammy-winning "Tomorrow's Children" CD.

Harvey went to his first demonstration in 1962, helping to de-segregate a roller rink in Columbus. In 1963 he heard Martin Luther King's "I Have a Dream" speech at the reflecting pool in Washington, and briefly met Dr. King on the Meredith March for civil rights in Grenada, Mississippi, in 1966.

Active in the movement against the war in Vietnam, Harvey marched on the Pentagon in 1967 and the Chicago Democratic Convention in 1968.  He helped found the legendary anti-war Liberation News Service, which was broken up in 1968 by the FBI's COINTELPRO operation.  He then helped found the communal organic Montague Farm in Massachusetts, which became a key launching ground for the 1960s movement against chemical farming.

In 1973 Harvey helped coin the phrase "No Nukes" and helped found the global grassroots movement against atomic energy, for which he has spoken throughout the US, Asia and Europe.  In 1976-8 he helped coordinate mass non-violent demonstrations against reactors being built in Seabrook, New Hampshire.  In 1979 he helped organize the legendary Musicians United for Safe Energy (MUSE) No Nukes Concerts and rally in Madison Square Garden.  He edited the informational booklet that accompanied the gold triple album that emerged.

In 1982 Harvey co-wrote KILLING OUR OWN:  THE DISASTER OF AMERICA'S EXPERIENCE WITH ATOMIC ENERGY, the first major book to assert that people died at Three Mile Island.  In 1990 he became Senior Advisor to Greenpeace USA, for whom he spoke to 350,000 semi-conscious rock fans at Woodstock 2 in 1994.  In Kiev in 1996 he spoked at the tenth anniversary commemoration of the Chernobyl disaster, and then at a rally in Kaliningrad, in the former Soviet Union, where he met with "liquidators" whose lives and health had been sacrificed in the Chernobyl clean-up.

In central Ohio, Harvey co-founded the Great Blue Heron Alliance, which saved 240 acres of land for a wildlife refuge and other grassroots organizations which  forced shut a trash-burning power plant, stopped a regional radioactive waste dump, shut a McDonald’s and saved the city of Bexley’s Jeffrey Park.

In 2004 Harvey joined with Bob Fitrakis to break most of the major stories on the theft of the 2004 presidential election in Ohio.  Called "the Woodward and Bernstein" of election protection by Rev. Jackson Jackson, Fitrakis and Wasserman have published four books on the American art of vote counting and curtailment.

In 2007 Harvey joined with Bonnie Raitt, Jackson Browne and Graham Nash to form NukeFree.org as part of a successful national grassroots campaign to stop $50 billion in loan guarantees to build new reactors.  Harvey now edits the www.nukefree.org website which posts a constant stream of articles on nuclear power and green energy.  He continues  to campaign for a green-powered Earth, against federal funding and all other new nuke boondoggles, and for a system of automatic voter registration and universal hand counted paper ballots---key elements on the road to Solartopia.

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