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HAPPY WORLD WATER DAY—Tell Congress: Access to Clean Drinking Water is a Basic Human Right!

HAPPY WORLD WATER DAY—Tell Congress: Access to Clean Drinking Water is a Basic Human Right!

Waterkeeper Alliance

The Clean Water Act—one of our nation’s key pieces of environmental legislation—allows millions of American’s to reclaim our nation’s waterways and make them safe for swimming, drinking and fishing. Sadly, the Clean Water Act is currently under attack.

A growing chorus of big polluters and their cronies in Congress is working to convince the public that the Clean Water Act is a “job killer”—equating environmental protection with economic disaster. The U.S. House of Representatives has spent this year—ironically, the 40th anniversary of the Clean Water Act—relentlessly trying to undermine the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and our environmental laws. They are taking direct aim at the Clean Water Act and seeking to strip the federal government’s authority to regulate water quality standards. They even want to weaken the U.S. EPA’s power to enforce the law and protect our communities!

One particularly egregious example exempts from the Clean Water Act pesticide applications in and around public waters. Pesticides are designed to be toxic to living things. They contaminate drinking water and are especially harmful to fish and amphibian life.

This bill has passed the House and is now pending in the U.S. Senate. 

Polluters have money and that buys political influence, but there's power in numbers. Together, we can fight back.   

On this World Water Day, join Waterkeeper Alliance in protecting the Clean Water Act for the health of our communities and the environment.

Sign the Tell Congress: Access to Clean Drinking Water is a Basic Human Right! petition today by clicking here.

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