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The Summer of Resistance starts NOW

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By Ryan Schleeter

In January, just days after Trump's inauguration, Greenpeace made a promise—we will RESIST.

We promised to resist xenophobia, racism and bigotry. We promised to resist climate denial, corruption and fossil fuels. And we promised to keep peacefully resisting every single one of Trump's threats to our climate and communities.


And right now, the Trump administration is working on all fronts to make those threats a reality. Whether it's oil and gas pipelines that pollute our air and water or immigration policies that tear apart families, we have no choice but to step up in peaceful protest.

Now it's time to write the next chapter in our resistance—together. One in which we tap into the power that lies within each of our communities to create the change we want to see. One in which we don't just play defense against Trump and his enablers, but peacefully demand the green and peaceful future we deserve.

That's what the Summer of Resistance is all about.

How to Get Involved in the Summer of Resistance

To defeat the Trump agenda, it's going to take all of us stepping up and speaking out in bold new ways. That's why there's a role for everyone to play in the Summer of Resistance. Whether you're ready to volunteer your time spreading the word, get trained up on non-violent direct action, or take to the streets, here's how you can launch your Summer of Resistance today

Step 1: Join a Kickoff Party With Resisters in Your Community

The Summer of Resistance starts with a huge training webcast on Sunday June 25, 1 p.m. PDT / 4 p.m. EDT. All you need to do to join is like Greenpeace USA on Facebook and you'll get a notification to join the live broadcast when it begins.

And remember, you don't have to go it alone! Resistance is more fun (and effective) with friends. That's why Greenpeace volunteers across the country are stepping up to host webcast viewing parties where you can meet fellow activists and start planning for what creative, non-violent resistance looks like in your community.

Head to www.summerofresistance.org and type in your zip code, or use the map to find a gathering near you. If you don't see one in your area, consider hosting your own!

Step 2: Build Your Skills at a Nonviolent Direct Action Training

The Summer of Resistance isn't just virtual—we're traveling to cities across the country to lead day-long deep dives on nonviolent direct action. Together, we'll explore how direct action, creative communication and peaceful protest can help you win big for social and environmental justice.

These trainings are for anyone who wants to skill up, step up and take action to stop the Trump agenda—no experience required. Space is limited, so RSVP today to secure your spot at one of the local Summer of Resistance trainings below:

Still have questions? We'd love to hear from you! Get in touch at [email protected] for more info on how to get involved in the Summer of Resistance in your community.

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