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Join the Summer of Resistance to Protect Our Planet

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Greenpeace

This summer, Greenpeace is traveling the country to train thousands of people in creative, non-violent resistance. And I want you to be one of them.


The hits from President Donald Trump and his crew of corporate cronies, white supremacists and climate deniers just keep coming.

As if denying climate change, stacking the federal government with fossil fuel insiders and resurrecting dangerous projects like the Keystone XL and Dakota Access pipelines weren't enough, Trump is now threatening to stop the rest of the world from reaching a clean energy future by pulling out of the Paris climate agreement.

As we have been since day one of this administration, we must RESIST.

Even in a sea of bad news, the unprecedented resistance to Trump's first 100 days in office has already won us some important victories. Now, it's up to us to keep that momentum going for as long as it takes to truly protect our climate and communities.

That's why we're launching the Summer of Resistance, an ambitious project to take the resistance movement to the next level.

And we're looking to the environmental movement supporters like you to make it a success—sign up today and take our short survey to let us know what you think the Summer of Resistance should look like.

I won't hide that I'm incredibly excited about this project.

At a time when the Trump administration is working on all fronts to advance its hateful agenda, the Summer of Resistance is a chance to come together and learn the skills of creative communication, peaceful protest and non-violent direct action necessary to step up our resistance.

We've already seen these bold acts of resistance inspire the movement and thwart the Trump agenda. Whether it's a single "RESIST" banner flying high above the White House, people flooding airports across the country to protest the Muslim ban, or hundreds of thousands of resisters marching in the streets for women, climate and immigrants—the resistance movement has proved time and again that we are willing to be in the streets and put our bodies on the line for social, environmental and economic justice.

For 45 years, Greenpeace has been built on bold acts of courage like these.

Together, it's how we've created change and how we've been resisting Trump's dangerous agenda since his election. Now more than ever, we want to build that power together with the resistance movement—and with members of the resistance movement like you.

Starting with a nationwide kickoff call on June 25, the Summer of Resistance is non-stop and action-packed. We're hosting trainings in 14-plus cities across the country, with acts of resistance and challenges to the Trump agenda everywhere we go along the way.

Together, we will resist Trump's threats to the Paris climate agreement; we will resist his attacks on our clean air and water; and we will resist his blatant and irresponsible climate denial. If you aren't willing to stand by while Trump strips away protections for our climate and communities, then the Summer of Resistance is for you—and I can't wait for you to join us.

Help make this wave of people-powered action impossible for Trump to ignore. Sign up for the Summer of Resistance today!

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