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'Warm Our Hearts Not Our Planet': Greenpeace Demands Climate Action From Trump and Putin

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'Warm Our Hearts Not Our Planet': Greenpeace Demands Climate Action From Trump and Putin
Greenpeace activists unfurled two large banners in the high bell tower of Kallio church in Helsinki, Finland on Monday. Greenpeace

By Jessica Corbett

As U.S. President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin came together in Helsinki, Finland on Monday for a closely watched summit, Greenpeace activists partnered with a local parish to unfurl two massive banners on the Kallio church's bell tower to call on the leaders to "warm our hearts not our planet."


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"Climate change is the defining challenge of our generation and its impacts are felt by us today, putting our lives in danger. Everywhere in the world, people are determined to break free from fossil fuels. It is disappointing that presidents Trump and Putin are not helping us," Greenpeace Nordic program manager for Finland Sini Harkki said in a statement. "But people power is the real superpower."

"Today, we are spelling this out: the change is already happening, with ordinary people leading and demanding a transition to clean, renewable energy worldwide and holding politicians and polluters to account," Harkki added. "Real leaders put Planet Earth first and tackle urgent global threats such as climate change, destruction of forests, and the unprecedented pressure on our oceans."

Greenpeace EU, in a tweet, outlined ways in which the international community can tackle threats posed by the climate crisis "head-on."

A religious leader from Kallio church and the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Finland tweeted messages of support for the action.


Reposted with permission from our media associate Common Dreams.

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