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New Documentary Explores Climate Change in Greenland

Climate
New Documentary Explores Climate Change in Greenland
A new documentary examines Greenland's ice sheets and glaciers. Meltdown trailer

By Bud Ward

"Meltdown" – a new documentary featuring renowned art photographer Lynn Davis and climate communications expert Anthony Leiserowitz, made its online debut February 12. Shot on location in Greenland and directed and produced by Academy Award nominees Fred Golding and Mike Tollin, the 67-minute video differs significantly from many other videos on Greenland, its glaciers, and ice sheet.


"It's not a scientific documentary. It's not an advocacy film. It's not a Hollywood disaster movie," Leiserowitz says.

He describes it instead as "an intimate exploration of art and science, beauty and tragedy, the personal and the global, set amidst the massive and spectacularly beautiful icebergs breaking off of Greenland at an accelerating rate."

The film is available for rent and/or purchase on a number of streaming services, including Amazon, Apple iTunes, Vudu, Xfinity, and other cable networks nationwide (not on Netflix). Rental and purchase prices vary somewhat among those services. The official trailer, embedded below, is available on YouTube.

 

Reposted with permission from Yale Climate Connections.

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