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Greenhouses: The Solution for Year-Round Local Food?

Food
Greenhouses: The Solution for Year-Round Local Food?

Wouldn't it be great if you could buy local produce year round when you live in colder climates?


EcoWatch has featured all sorts of innovative solutions for year-round sustainable agriculture. Some of these include two young entrepreneurs who are turning old shipping containers into high-tech indoor farms, and another entrepreneur who produced a step-by-step guide on how to build a passive solar greenhouse that utilizes renewable energy and is built from natural and recycled materials.

We've also featured a Swedish couple that built a greenhouse around their home to grow food and keep warm, and a solar-powered "farm from a box" that has everything you need to run an off-grid farm.

In colder climates, greenhouses and hoop houses, which extend the growing season, are crucial to providing a year-round supply of local food.

To learn more on how greenhouses can bring us local produce during winter months, listen to this interview with BrightFarms CEO Paul Lightfoot on NPR's All Things Considered:

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