Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Green Your Down Dog With Yoga Mats Made From 100% Recycled Wetsuits

Business

Süga is a company that manufactures yoga mats made in the USA from 100 percent recycled wetsuits. The name Süga "evokes the two worlds it straddles: surfing and yoga," explains founder Brian Shields, whose a surfer and a yogi.

Surfers enjoy a bond with the environment, says Shields but "we struggle to reduce our impact." He wanted to turn these non-biodegradable wetsuits, which would otherwise end up in the landfill, into "highly functional instruments of yogic bliss," as he puts it.

Yoga mats are often made with chemicals that can be hazardous to your human health. Azodicarbonamide is one such chemical, which, strangely enough, use to be used in the bread of the fast-food chain Subway until last year. Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and other questionable materials including phthalates, lead and cadmium, have found their way into standard yoga mats, as well.

Since Süga mats are made from neoprene, they're naturally a "closed-cell foam," says Shields, so they don't "sponge up" bacteria, sweat, dust and dirt from yoga studio floors like other mats. Neoprene does, however, contain dialkyl thioureas, which has been linked to allergic contact dermatitis.

"The SügaMat has undergone significant R&D and beta-testing prior to being unleashed on yogis worldwide," says Süga. "Although our mats are made from recycled wetsuits, they perform better than any mat on the market. We have built them to specific tolerances of density, tackiness (both wet and dry), elasticity, durability, and liquid permeability and retention. We are confident that you'll dig every asana on your SügaMat."

The project is currently raising money on Kickstarter and has raised half of its goal of $20,000 to date. Large-scale production will begin in January.

If you donate $69 to the Kickstarter campaign, you'll receive a SügaMat. And if you donate $89, you'll receive a Cradle2Grave SügaMat—that is, one with a lifetime guarantee. If anything happens to your mat, you can return it to Süga and they will send you a new one for free. They're also asking anyone with an old wetsuit to donate it, so they can turn it into a yoga mat. In exchange for the donation, you will get a 10 percent discount on a mat.

Check out Süga's video here:

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Adidas Unveils 3D-Printed Shoe Made From Plastic Ocean Waste

Solar Powered ‘Farm from a Box’: Everything You Need to Run an Off-Grid Farm

$300 Underground Greenhouse Grows Your Food Year-Round

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Heavy industry on the lower Mississippi helps to create dead zones. AJ Wallace on Unsplash.

Cutting out coal-burning and other sources of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from heavy industry, electricity production and traffic will reduce the size of the world's dead zones along coasts where all fish life is vanishing because of a lack of oxygen.

Read More Show Less

Despite the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, which has restricted the ability to gather in peaceful assembly, a Canadian company has moved forward with construction of the controversial Keystone XL pipeline, according to the AP.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
A gas flare from the Shell Chemical LP petroleum refinery illuminates the sky on August 21, 2019 in Norco, Louisiana. Drew Angerer / Getty Images.

Methane levels in the atmosphere experienced a dramatic rise in 2019, preliminary data released Sunday shows.

Read More Show Less
A retired West Virginia miner suffering from black lung visits a doctor for tests. Andrew Lichtenstein / Corbis via Getty Images

In some states like West Virginia, coal mines have been classified as essential services and are staying open during the COVID-19 pandemic, even though the close quarters miners work in and the known risks to respiratory health put miners in harm's way during the spread of the coronavirus.

Read More Show Less
Solar panel installations and a wind turbine at the Phu Lac wind farm in southern Vietnam's Binh Thuan province on April 23, 2019. MANAN VATSYAYANA / AFP via Getty Images

Renewable energy made up almost three quarters of all new energy capacity added in 2019, data released Monday by the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) shows.

Read More Show Less