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Green Technology Thinkshop April 20

Energy
Green Technology Thinkshop April 20

Green Technology Thinkshop

The Springmill Learning Center, an innovative outdoor education facility in Mansfield, Ohio, will host the Green Technology Thinkshop on Saturday, April 20 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Schedule of events:

9 a.m.: Pass the Pump
Richland Moves bicycle group will present their work on a complete streets plan for Mansfield including work they have done on a bicycle map route project.

10 a.m.: New Age Gardening
Jonathan Hull is an environmental educator, designer and consultant and co-founder of Green Triangle, a network of permaculture educators and designers based in Cleveland. An avid researcher and experimenter, he is dedicated to making permaculture accessible and exciting for everyone.

10 a.m.: Showing of Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax

11 a.m.: Alternative Energy
A look at clean, sustainable options available in Ohio from wind and solar resources.

Noon: Brown Bag Lunch
Bring your own lunch and take time to network with others.

1 p.m.: How Renewables Outshine Fossil Fuels
Mansfield Councilwoman Ellen Haring will introduce our keynote speaker Stefanie Spear, CEO and editor-in-chief of EcoWatch, and president of Expedite Renewable Energy. Spear has been publishing environmental news for more than 23 years. She works to unite the voices of the grassroots environmental movement and mobilize millions of people to engage in democracy to protect human health and the environment. Spear seeks to motivate individuals to become engaged in their community, adopt sustainable practices and support strong environmental policy.

2 p.m.: Guided Tour of the Springmill Learning Center
Take a guided tour to learn about the Springmill Learning Center which is a premier outdoor education facility. The 40-acre site boasts many natural features, interactive classrooms and a seven stage character building rope challenge course, the Adventure Gallery.

Admission is free. We invite the public to actively participate in alternative living concepts that are making our community healthy prosperous and sustainable. Click here for more information.

Visit EcoWatch’s RENEWABLES page for more related news on this topic.

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Click here to tell Congress to Expedite Renewable Energy.

 

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