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Green Roof Helps Vietnamese Kindergartners Learn Sustainability and Grow Food

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Green Roof Helps Vietnamese Kindergartners Learn Sustainability and Grow Food

We're always talking about providing early education for children regarding whatever it is we hope they perfect in the future, so why should things be any different when it comes to sustainability?

A school for kindergartners in Vietnam now provides one of the world's best examples. Vo Trong Nghia Architects recently announced the completion of construction at "Farming Kindergarten," a large school that teaches its students how to grow their own food on its green roof, while also deploying solar water heating and using recycled materials.

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"Architectural and mechanical energy-saving methods are comprehensively applied including: Green roof, PC-concrete louver for shading, using recycle materials, water recycling, solar water heating and more," according to Vo Trong Nghia. "These devices are designed visibly in order for children to realize the important role of sustainable education."

The school in the province of Dongnai was built for 500 students. Its triple-ring-shaped roof has three courtyards within. That means plenty of room to learn, play and grow food.

The school is a pilot project for the Vietnam Green Building Council's LOTUS rating, which certifies the sustainability and environmentally friendly performance of a structure.

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