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Greedy Lying Bastards: New Film Exposes Climate Denial Machine

Climate
Greedy Lying Bastards: New Film Exposes Climate Denial Machine

DeSmogBlog

By Kevin Grandia

Greedy Lying Bastards is a new film hitting mainstream theaters nationwide this weekend.

If you like DeSmogBlog, you're going to love this film.

Here's the Rotten Tomatoes review, including theater times. (Feel free to add your own star rating!) 

The film, produced by actress Daryl Hannah and directed by Craig Rosebraugh, essentially tells the DeSmogBlog story. Greedy Lying Bastards chronicles the dirty money trail from tobacco companies paying for fake experts to attack the science linking cigarettes and cancer, through to the modern day equivalent of oil companies paying fake experts and think tanks to attack climate science and fight against any government attempts to regulate pollution to protect public health. 

Michael O'Sullivan's review in the Washington Post today describes Greedy Lying Bastards best:

There actually is plenty of sober—and sobering—evidence presented to support the film’s thesis that (a) climate change is real, (b) it’s our fault and (c) a bunch of bad guys have prevented us from getting a handle on it. It’s that last part, alluded to in the film’s title, that is the film’s bread and butter.

The film showcases the strange and wonderful "carnival barkers" like Lord Christopher Monckton, the spindoctors like Marc Morano and, of course, the heroes—like the embattled climate scientists James Hansen and Michael Mann, our longtime friend Kert Davies at Greenpeace, EPA whistleblower Rick Piltz and DeSmogBlog's founder Jim Hoggan.

Here's the trailer (while you're watching, there's a call for a Congressional investigation into the climate deniers and their funders that you can sign at ExposeTheBastards.com):

Please spread the word to everyone you know in cities where the film is showing this weekend.

Visit EcoWatch’s CLIMATE CHANGE page for more related news on this topic.

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