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EcoWatch Gratitude Photo Contest: Submit Now!

EcoWatch is pleased to announce its first photo contest! Show us what in nature you are most thankful for this Thanksgiving. Whether you have a love for oceans, animals, or parks, we want to see your best photos that capture what you love about this planet.


Send your photo to bautista@ecowatch.com with the subject line "ECOWATCH PHOTO CONTEST" by November 16th with the following information for a chance to have your photo appear on EcoWatch and win a $250 Patagonia eGift Card:

1. Name

2. Email

3. Phone Number

4. Photo Submission file (.jpeg file format recommended)

5. Caption

Our judges will choose the winning photo and the winner will be announced on November 21st. One submission per person.

All submissions will be evaluated by our wonderful judges Stephen Donofrio, Gaelin Rosenwaks and Marc Bryan-Brown to decide who the winner is.

Stephen Donofrio

Stephen Donofrio's work spans across sectors on climate, water, and forests sustainability, branching out to include carbon finance, cap-and-trade, corporate responsibility, and forest risk free agricultural supply chain management. He launched Greenpoint Innovations in 2014 with the aim of delivering compelling insights and unforgettable stories with the integration of innovative technologies and the arts. Aside from Greenpoint Innovations, he serves as a director at Forest Trends, is a regular public speaker at global forums, and is an associate educator at Boston College and Arizona University.

Website: www.greenpointinnovations.com

Instagram: @stephendonofrio

Gaelin Rosenwaks

Gaelin Rosenwaks is a marine scientist, explorer, photographer and filmmaker. Alarmed by the changes happening in the oceans, Gaelin founded Global Ocean Exploration, Inc. to share her passion for ocean exploration, marine conservation, and fishing through powerful imagery, words and adventure. She now participates and conducts expeditions in every ocean to alert the public not only to the challenges facing the oceans, but also to what science is doing to understand these changes.

Website: www.gaelinrosenwaks.com

Instagram: @GaelinGOExplore

Marc Bryan-Brown

Documentary photographer Marc Bryan-Brown has been shooting people, places and things for more than 30 years. Starting in the music industry he was Whitney Houston's personal photographer at the peak of her career. Following that he moved into travel and expedition work. He is cited by the Mountainview Museum of Computing as being on the first "online expedition" and the 1994 Friendship Flight Across Arctic Siberia where images and reports were filed from the field to a website. Marc lives in the New York Hudson Valley with his wife Florence Seery.

By entering this photo contest you are granting EcoWatch the right to use your photo on our site and our media channels in conjunction with this contest without the written permission of the photographer. Unless otherwise instructed, EcoWatch reserves the right to use photo submissions on our site and in our media channels aside from the contest. If you do not wish to give EcoWatch the rights to use your photo aside from the current photo contest that you are participating in, please let us know within your email submission with the text "No, I do not want to give EcoWatch the rights to use my photos in other media aside from the current photo contest that I am participating in."

More Contest Details:

Entry Details

  • Photo submissions must be original work taken by the contest entrant.
  • By entering this photo contest you are granting EcoWatch the right to use your photo on our site and our media channels in conjunction with this contest without the written permission of the photographer.
  • Unless otherwise instructed, EcoWatch reserves the right to use photo submissions on our site and in our media channels aside from the contest.
  • The winner's name will be announced alongside the winning photo submission.
  • Photos that have already been submitted to other contests currently ongoing or have already won prizes in other contests are not eligible.
  • Image files created through any device capable of taking still images, such as smartphones and digital still cameras, will be accepted.
  • Color and monochrome images are valid for entry.
  • After judging concludes, the winners will be notified by email sent to their listed email address by November 21st. The Patagonia eGift Card will be sent to the same listed email address.

Disclaimers

  • EcoWatch reserves the right to void entries that depict brand logos or other intellectual property, whether on electronic signs, posters, or in other forms, or that in its judgment are harmful to public order, go against standards of decency, or are conflicting to the goals of the contest.
  • EcoWatch is not responsible for the resolution of legal issues arising from the entrants submitted photos and will not pay any costs thereby incurred.
  • EcoWatch does not bear any costs to the entrants that incur by entering the contest.
  • Submitted entries may not be withdrawn or returned.
  • EcoWatch reserves the right to suspend or postpone the receipt of any or all entries if it is judged that the contest is unable to be run effectively, smoothly, or without affecting the fairness of judging.
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