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Grandparents Arrested Protesting Keystone XL

Energy
Grandparents Arrested Protesting Keystone XL

Earth First! Newswire

Fifty-four people blocked work inside Environmental Resource Management (ERM), the oil contractor in charge of writing the environmental review for the Keystone XL pipeline.

The massive corporation hid their ties to big oil companies like Exxon Mobil and even TransCanada—an illegal act that exposes deep conflict of interest.

So today, activists for Walk for Grandkids locked down in front of the ERM offices, refusing to let business as usual proceed.

We have reports of some police violence, but activists held down the barricade for over four hours—a testament to their bravery. All 54 activists have been arrested, and there is a support team working to get them out.

Visit EcoWatch’s KEYSTONE XL and PIPELINES pages for more related news on this topic.

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