Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Gov. Jerry Brown Discusses Role of Climate Change in California's 10 Wildfires in the Past Week

Climate
Gov. Jerry Brown Discusses Role of Climate Change in California's 10 Wildfires in the Past Week

Ten wildfires in San Diego County, CA last week compounded the state's brutal, historic, three-year dry season.

About 25,000 acres of land were scorched by the fires, causing nearly $20 million in damage. State firefighters have responded to more than 1,500 wildfires this year.

Gov. Jerry Brown spoke about the grave situation Sunday on ABC's This Week. He didn't mince words when discussing how climate change has influenced the blazes.

"As we send billions and billions of tons of heat-trapping gases [into the atmosphere], we get heat and we get fires and we get what we are seeing," he said. "We're going to deal with nature as best we can, but humanity is on a collision course with nature, and we're just going to have to adapt to it the best we can."


According to ABC, there have been twice as many fires this year as the average over the past five years. Brown said the situation is under control "for the moment," but conceded that this season was more serious than he has seen in the past. Many evacuees in San Diego County were expected to be allowed to return to their homes Sunday night, but many are coming back to nothing.

The state spent about $600 million responding to the dry season and needs to add "thousands more" to the 5,000 or so firefighters it already has, Brown said.

"In California, for 10,000 years, our population was about 300,000—now, it's 38 million," the governor said. "We have more structures, more activity, more sparks, more combustible activity, and we've got to gear up for it. As the climate changes, this is going to be a radically different future than our historic past."

Brown also provides enlightening answer when host George Stephanopoulos asks him about climate denial and if the state can adapt while politicians fail to get on the same page. He added that state officials will "do more" to respond to the drought despite already having what he deems as the best program to reduce greenhouse gases in the country.

"Until then, we have to fight all these damn fires," Brown said.

——–

YOU ALSO MIGHT LIKE

Hundreds of California Businesses Band Together in Face of Devastating Drought

White House’s Alarming Climate Change Study Calls For ‘Urgent Action’

——– 

Coast Guard members work to clean an oil spill impacting Delaware beaches. U.S. Coast Guard District 5

Environmental officials and members of the U.S. Coast Guard are racing to clean up a mysterious oil spill that has spread to 11 miles of Delaware coastline.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

What happened to all that plastic you've put in the recycling bin over the years? Halfpoint / Getty Images

By Dr. Kate Raynes-Goldie

Of all the plastic we've ever produced, only 9% has been recycled. So what happened to all that plastic you've put in the recycling bin over the years?

Read More Show Less

Trending

Plain Naturals offers a wide variety of CBD products including oils, creams and gummies.

Plain Naturals is making waves in the CBD space with a new product line for retail customers looking for high potency CBD products at industry-low prices.

Read More Show Less
Donald Trump and Joe Biden arrive onstage for the final presidential debate at Belmont University in Nashville, Tennessee, on Oct. 22, 2020. JIM WATSON / AFP via Getty Images

Towards the end of the final presidential debate of the 2020 election season, the moderator asked both candidates how they would address both the climate crisis and job growth, leading to a nearly 12-minute discussion where Donald Trump did not acknowledge that the climate is changing and Joe Biden called the climate crisis an existential threat.

Read More Show Less
What will happen to all these batteries once they wear out? Ronny Hartmann / AFP / Getty Images

By Zheng Chen and Darren H. S. Tan

As concern mounts over the impacts of climate change, many experts are calling for greater use of electricity as a substitute for fossil fuels. Powered by advancements in battery technology, the number of plug-in hybrid and electric vehicles on U.S. roads is increasing. And utilities are generating a growing share of their power from renewable fuels, supported by large-scale battery storage systems.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch