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Presidential Candidate Jay Inslee Unveiled His First Major Climate Plan

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Presidential Candidate Jay Inslee Unveiled His First Major Climate Plan
Gov. Jay Inslee seen speaking during the Climate Strike at Columbia University in New York City. Michael Brochstein / SOPA Images / LightRocket / Getty Images

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee unveiled an ambitious clean energy plan Friday, the first major policy platform for his climate-change-focused 2020 campaign.


Dubbed the "100 Percent Clean Energy for America Plan," the proposal would phase out coal over the next decade, requiring all power production to be emissions-free by 2035. The plan also mandates that all new vehicles be electric and commercial buildings must meet a zero-carbon standard by 2030.

Inslee's proposal has garnered support from the Sunrise Movement, the driving youth force behind the Green New Deal, which made headlines last week after offering an initial critique of fellow 2020 nominee Beto O'Rourke's less ambitious climate action plan.

For a deeper dive:

News: New York Times, Seattle Times, WSJ, Axios, Vice, Gizmodo, Buzzfeed, Politico

Sunrise: The Hill

Commentary: Vox, David Roberts analysis

For more climate change and clean energy news, you can follow Climate Nexus on Twitter and Facebook, and sign up for daily Hot News.

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