Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Gov. Brown Asks GOP Presidential Candidates: What Are You Going to Do About Climate Change?

Climate

California Gov. Jerry Brown sent a letter yesterday to the 2016 GOP presidential candidates ahead of the first Republican primary debate in Cleveland, Ohio tomorrow night. The letter was addressed to Donald Trump, the frontrunner, but meant for all of the candidates. In the letter, Brown invokes his state's now "year-round" fire season and its epic drought as proof that climate change is not some "abstract" and far off threat. It's real, it's here and it's here to stay, says Brown.

"This is the new normal. The climate is changing," Brown says. "Given the challenge and the stakes, my question to you is simple: What are you going to do about it? What is your plan to deal with the threat of climate change?" Brown also submitted this question to the Fox News Facebook page, where people were asked to upload questions that might be featured during the debate.

None of the top GOP presidential candidates have taken a strong stance on climate change. Several have flat-out denied that it's occurring, calling it a hoax or invoking the absurd "I'm not a scientist" argument. Climate change "held almost no weight in the presidential race in 2012," reports the Sacramento Bee. That is expected to change this time around, especially with the release of President Obama's clean power plan earlier this week.

"Continuing to question the science and hurl insults at 'global warming hoaxsters' and 'apostles of this pseudo-religion' won't prevent severe damage to our health and economic well-being," says Brown, who is encouraging bipartisanship on this issue. "Americans, their children and generations to come deserve—and demand—better."

Citing his recent visit to the Vatican, Brown points out that the rest of the world is moving forward on this issue and the U.S. needs to step up and be a leader. The California governor highlights the bold steps his own state plans to take to address climate change, including reducing greenhouse gas emissions 40 percent below 1990 levels, increasing from one-third to 50 percent the electricity derived from renewable sources and reducing petroleum use in cars and trucks by up to 50 percent all in the next 15 years. And he made sure to point out that California still outpaced the rest of the country in job growth in the past year.

Ending his letter, Brown warns, "As the fires continue to burn here in California, don't wait for the smoke to clear. It's time to act."

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Hillary’s Horror Video Bashes GOP Climate Deniers

Jason Mraz: Stand With Farmers, Fight the Drought, Help Reverse Climate Change

Neil deGrasse Tyson: Politicians, Stop ‘Cherry-Picking Science’ for Political Gain

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A scenic view of West Papua. Reza Fakhrudin / Pexels

By Arkilaus Kladit

My name is Arkilaus Kladit. I'm from the Knasaimos-Tehit tribe in South Sorong Regency, West Papua Province, Indonesia. For decades my tribe has been fighting to protect our forests from outsiders who want to log it or clear it for palm oil. For my people, the forest is our mother and our best friend. Everything we need to survive comes from the forest: food, medicines, building materials, and there are many sacred sites in the forest.

Read More Show Less
Everyone overthinks their lives or options every once in a while. Some people, however, can't stop the wheels and halt their train of thoughts. Peter Griffith / Getty Images

By Farah Aqel

Overthinkers are people who are buried in their own obsessive thoughts. Imagine being in a large maze where each turn leads into an even deeper and knottier tangle of catastrophic, distressing events — that is what it feels like to them when they think about the issues that confront them.

Read More Show Less
A newly developed catalyst would transform carbon dioxide from power plants and other sources into ethanol. DWalker44 / E+ / Getty Images

Researchers at the Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory have discovered a cheap, efficient way to convert carbon dioxide into liquid fuel, potentially reducing the amount of new carbon dioxide pumped into the atmosphere.

Read More Show Less
Eureka Sound on Ellesmere Island in the Canadian Arctic taken by NASA's Operation IceBridge in 2014. NASA / Michael Studinger / Flickr / CC by 2.0

A 4,000-year-old ice shelf in the Canadian Arctic has collapsed into the sea, leaving Canada without any fully intact ice shelves, Reuters reported. The Milne Ice Shelf lost more than 40 percent of its area in just two days at the end of July, said researchers who monitored its collapse.

Read More Show Less
Teachers and activists attend a protest hosted by Chicago Teachers Union in Chicago, Illinois on Aug. 3, 2020 to demand classroom safety measures as schools debate reopening. KAMIL KRZACZYNSKI / AFP via Getty Images

The coronavirus cases surging around the U.S. are often carried by kids, raising fears that the reopening of schools will be delayed and calling into question the wisdom of school districts that have reopened already.

Read More Show Less
Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern holds up COVID-19 alert levels during a press conference at Parliament on March 21, 2020 in Wellington, New Zealand. Hagen Hopkins / Getty Images

By Michael Baker, Amanda Kvalsvig and Nick Wilson

On Sunday, New Zealand marked 100 days without community transmission of COVID-19.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Medics with Austin-Travis County EMS transport a nursing home resident with coronavirus symptoms on Aug. 3, 2020 in Austin, Texas. John Moore / Getty Images

The U.S. passed five million coronavirus cases on Sunday, according to data from Johns Hopkins University, just 17 days after it hit the four-million case mark.

Read More Show Less