Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

GoPro Camera Found After Two Years Shows Breathtaking Footage of Grand Canyon From 'Edge of Space'

GoPro Camera Found After Two Years Shows Breathtaking Footage of Grand Canyon From 'Edge of Space'

The Grand Canyon is truly a sight to behold. It's 277 miles long, up to 18 miles wide and more than a mile deep in parts.

"The Canyon’s mile-high walls display a largely undisturbed cross section of the Earth’s crust extending back some 2 billion years," says the National Park Service. That fact really brings to mind the expression, "man, if these walls could talk ..."

Thanks to geologists and other scientists who have extensively studied this beautiful area, public opinion of the Grand Canyon region changed dramatically from that of "a worthless locale" to "the most sublime of earthly spectacles," says the park service. And "after nearly 150 years, geologists are still not finished studying the Grand Canyon."

In June 2013, a group of students sent a GoPro camera attached to a balloon "to the edge of space" (the stratosphere) over the Grand Canyon. The video of that effort was just published last week, and the footage is pretty breathtaking. So, why did it take two years for the footage to be posted? One of the students explains on Reddit how the camera got lost, despite the group's planning.

The group planned to use GPS to track the camera once it fell to the desert floor. They programmed a cell phone attached to the camera to send a text message once it had a signal as it was returning back to Earth. “The problem was that the coverage map we were relying on (looking at you, AT&T) was not accurate, so the phone never got signal as it came back to Earth, and we never heard from it,” explained the student.

Ironically then, the footage ended up being retrieved two years later when "a woman who works at AT&T was on a hike one day and spotted our phone in the barren desert," said the student. "She brings it to an AT&T store, and they identify my friend’s SIM card. We got the footage and data a few weeks later!”

Here is the footage from that GoPro camera:

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Shocking Polar Bear Photos Show Stark Reality of Climate Change

Erin Brockovich Stands With Navajo Nation, Accuses EPA of Lying About Colorado’s Toxic Mine Waste Spill

Bees Win Big in Court, EPA’s Approval of Toxic Pesticide Overturned

A 3-hour special film by EarthxTV calls for protection of the Amazon and its indigenous populations. EarthxTV.org

To save the planet, we must save the Amazon rainforest. To save the rainforest, we must save its indigenous peoples. And to do that, we must demarcate their land.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres delivers a video speech at the high-level meeting of the 46th session of the United Nations Human Rights Council UNHRC in Geneva, Switzerland on Feb. 22, 2021. Xinhua / Zhang Cheng via Getty Images

By Anke Rasper

"Today's interim report from the UNFCCC is a red alert for our planet," said UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres.

The report, released Friday, looks at the national climate efforts of 75 states that have already submitted their updated "nationally determined contributions," or NDCs. The countries included in the report are responsible for about 30% of the world's global greenhouse gas emissions.

Read More Show Less

Trending

New Delhi's smog is particularly thick, increasing the risk of vehicle accidents. SAJJAD HUSSAIN / AFP via Getty Images

India's New Delhi has been called the "world air pollution capital" for its high concentrations of particulate matter that make it harder for its residents to breathe and see. But one thing has puzzled scientists, according to The Guardian. Why does New Delhi see more blinding smogs than other polluted Asian cities, such as Beijing?

Read More Show Less
A bridge over the Delaware river connects New Hope, Pennsylvania with Lambertville, New Jersey. Richard T. Nowitz / Getty Images

In a historic move, the Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC) voted Thursday to ban hydraulic fracking in the region. The ban was supported by all four basin states — New Jersey, Delaware, Pennsylvania and New York — putting a permanent end to hydraulic fracking for natural gas along the 13,539-square-mile basin, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported.

Read More Show Less
Woodpecker

Colombia is one of the world's largest producers of coffee, and yet also one of the most economically disadvantaged. According to research by the national statistic center DANE, 35% of the population in Columbia lives in monetary poverty, compared to an estimated 11% in the U.S., according to census data. This has led to a housing insecurity issue throughout the country, one which construction company Woodpecker is working hard to solve.

Read More Show Less