Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

GOP Urged to Talk Climate at Tonight's Debate

Climate

During tonight’s Republican presidential debate, NextGen Climate will run “Who We Are,” a new TV and digital ad calling on our next president to lead the world on climate change action and lay out a plan to achieve more than 50 percent clean energy by 2030. The ad will run on CNBC as part of a six-figure national TV and digital buy.

Watch the ad here:

It’s time for the Republican presidential candidates to recognize that America is ready to tackle the threat of climate change head-on and lead the world on clean energy solutions. Citigroup estimates that failure to act on climate change will result in $44 trillion in lost global GDP by 2060 and 45 major U.S. companies have committed to cut their carbon pollution and completely transition to clean energy.

Meanwhile, thousands of American businesses are already seizing the opportunity presented by the transition to clean energy. Last year, the solar industry added jobs 20 times faster than the rest of the economy, with more Americans now employed in wind and solar than coal mining, and investment in clean energy startups totaling roughly $8 billion annually. Our next president must build on this momentum and lay out a plan to power our country with more than 50 percent clean energy by 2030. #50by30 is achievable, popular and necessary to solve climate change: so what are the Republican presidential candidates waiting for?

Climate change and clean energy aren’t partisan issues: Republican voters know that climate change is an urgent threat to our country’s economic and national security and are looking for leadership from the next president. Poll after poll shows that Republican voters strongly support the transition to a clean energy economy. Last week, a new poll from the University of Texas at Austin shows a “massive shift” on climate attitudes among Republicans, a majority of whom now support increasing clean energy production. Moreover, a Hart Research poll released in August found that 54 percent of Republicans in key battleground states favor a goal to power our country with more than 50 percent clean energy by 2030.

Tonight, the Republican presidential candidates must finally listen to their voters and tell the American people how they would tackle the threat of climate change and accelerate the transition to a clean energy economy.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Stunning Drone Footage Shows Greenland Literally Melting Away

GOP Candidates vs. the Clean Energy Revolution

Snowball-Throwing, Climate-Denying Senator May Crash Paris Climate Talks

Stephen Colbert Compares 2016 Election to the Hunger Games

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

polaristest / Flickr / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

By Melissa Kravitz Hoeffner

Over six gallons of water are required to produce one gallon of wine. "Irrigation, sprays, and frost protection all [used in winemaking] require a lot of water," explained winemaker and sommelier Keith Wallace, who's also a professor and the founder of the Wine School of Philadelphia, the largest independent wine school in the U.S. And water waste is just the start of the climate-ruining inefficiencies commonplace in the wine industry. Sustainably speaking, climate change could be problematic for your favorite glass of wine.

Read More Show Less
Pixabay

By Rachael Link, MS, RD

Spinach is a true nutritional powerhouse, as it's rich in vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Pexels

By Jeff Turrentine

From day to day, our public health infrastructure — the people and systems we've put in place to keep populations, as opposed to individuals, healthy — largely goes unnoticed. That's because when it's working well, its success takes the form of utter normalcy.

Read More Show Less
Spring Break vs. COVID19: The Real Impact of Ignoring Social Distancing

By Eoin Higgins

A viral video showing cell phone data collected by location accuracy company X-Mode from spring break partiers potentially spreading the coronavirus around the U.S. has brought up questions of digital privacy even as it shows convincingly the importance of staying home to defeat the disease.

Read More Show Less
Aerial shot top view Garbage trucks unload garbage to a recycle in the vicinity of the city of Bangkok, Thailand. bugto / Moment / Getty Images

German researchers have identified a strain of bacterium that not only breaks down toxic plastic, but also uses it as food to fuel the process, according to The Guardian.

Read More Show Less