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GMO OMG: New Film Explores Far-Reaching Consequences of Global Food Monopoly

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GMO OMG

GMO OMG tells the story of a father’s discovery of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) through researching the symbolic act of poor Haitian farmers burning Monsanto’s gift of 475 tons of hybrid corn and vegetable seeds after the devastating earthquake of January 2010.

After a journey to Haiti to learn why hungry farmers would burn seeds, the real awakening of what has happened to our food in the U.S., what we are feeding our families and what is at stake for the global food supply unfolds in a trip across the U.S. and other countries in search of answers.

Are we at a tipping point? Is it time to take back our food?

The encroaching darkness of unknown health and environmental risks, seed take over, chemical toxins and food monopoly meets with the light of a growing resistance of organic farmers, concerned citizens and a burgeoning movement to take back what we have lost. By the simple act of feeding ourselves, we unwittingly participate in the largest experiment ever conducted on human beings.

Massive agrochemical companies like Monsanto (Agent Orange) and Dow (Napalm) are feeding us GMOs that have never been fully tested and aren’t labeled. This small handful of corporations is tightening their grip on the world’s food supply—buying, modifying and patenting seeds to ensure total control over everything we eat. We still have time to heal the planet, feed the world and live sustainably.

Visit EcoWatch’s GE FOODS page for more related news on this topic.

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