Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Global Frackdown 2 Calls for a Worldwide Ban on Hydraulic Fracturing

Energy
Global Frackdown 2 Calls for a Worldwide Ban on Hydraulic Fracturing

On Oct. 19, people from around the world will unite for a day of action to protest fracking. A project of Food & Water Watch, the second annual Global Frackdown will bring thousands of people together that are calling for an international ban on fracking. 

Filmmaker Josh Fox calls on concerned citizens around the world to join together for the Global Frackdown event in the video below.

According to Global Frackdown, the anti-fracking movement has grown exponentially since the event last year, which included 200 community actions in more than 20 countries. Accomplishments include:

  • Passing more than 336 measures against fracking, wastewater injection and frac-sand mining in communities across the U.S.
  • Passing a moratorium on fracking in the Delaware River Basin Commission
  • Banning fracking in Longmont, CO
  • Passing an indefinite moratorium on fracking in Vermont
  • Upholding bans on fracking in Bulgaria and France, despite intensive pressure from industry
  • Pushing for moratoria in multiple regions in Europe
  • Obtaining local referenda on fracking in Romania, which rejected fracking by more than 90 percent
  • Pushing for a ban on fracking in areas for drinking water provision in Germany
  • Passing moratoria on fracking in the Netherlands and the Czech Republic
  • Organizing to oppose fracking in communities in Argentina, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco and Egypt
  • Spurring the introduction of new laws for assessing unconventional gas impacts in Australia
  • Delaying fracking in South Africa and the Republic of Ireland
  • Forcing the European Union to start analyzing the risks of fracking in Europe
  • Persuading 262 Members of the European Parliament—more than one-third—to vote in favor of an immediate moratorium on shale gas

According to Global Frackdown, the fossil fuel industry is working hard to protect its profits and drown out demand for clean energy, while grassroots organizations around the world are working even harder to raise awareness and protect precious global resources from fracking.

Visit EcoWatch’s FRACKING page for more related news on this topic.

——–

Colette Pichon Battle, attorney, founder, and executive director of the Gulf Coast Center for Law & Policy. Colette Pichon Battle

By Karen L. Smith-Janssen

Colette Pichon Battle gave a December 2019 TEDWomen Talk on the stark realities of climate change displacement, and people took notice. The video racked up a million views in about two weeks. The attorney, founder, and executive director of the Gulf Coast Center for Law & Policy (GCCLP) advocates for climate justice in communities of color. Confronted with evidence showing how her own South Louisiana coastal home of Bayou Liberty will be lost to flooding in coming years, the 2019 Obama Fellow dedicates herself to helping others still reeling from the impacts of Katrina face the heavy toll that climate change has taken—and will take—on their lives and homelands. Her work focuses on strengthening multiracial coalitions, advocating for federal, state, and local disaster mitigation measures, and redirecting resources toward Black communities across the Gulf South.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A palm tree plantation in Malaysia. Yann Arthus-Bertrand / Getty Images Plus

Between 2000 and 2013, Earth lost an area of undisturbed ecosystems roughly the size of Mexico.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A home burns during the Bobcat Fire in Juniper Hills, California on September 18, 2020. Kyle Grillot / AFP/ Getty Images

By Stuart Braun

"These are not just wildfires, they are climate fires," Jay Inslee, Governor of Washington State, said as he stood amid the charred remains of the town of Malden west of Seattle earlier this month. "This is not an act of God," he added. "This has happened because we have changed the climate of the state of Washington in dramatic ways."

Read More Show Less
A new report from Oxfam found that the wealthiest one percent of the world produced a carbon footprint that was more than double that of the bottom 50 percent of the world. PickPik

A new report from Oxfam found that the wealthiest one percent of the world produced a carbon footprint that was more than double that of the bottom 50 percent of the world, The Guardian reported. The study examined 25 years of carbon dioxide emissions and wealth inequality from 1990 to 2015.

Read More Show Less
The label of one of the recalled thyroid medications. FDA

If you are taking medication for an underactive thyroid, check your prescription.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch