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Global Frackdown 2 Calls for a Worldwide Ban on Hydraulic Fracturing

Energy
Global Frackdown 2 Calls for a Worldwide Ban on Hydraulic Fracturing

On Oct. 19, people from around the world will unite for a day of action to protest fracking. A project of Food & Water Watch, the second annual Global Frackdown will bring thousands of people together that are calling for an international ban on fracking. 

Filmmaker Josh Fox calls on concerned citizens around the world to join together for the Global Frackdown event in the video below.

According to Global Frackdown, the anti-fracking movement has grown exponentially since the event last year, which included 200 community actions in more than 20 countries. Accomplishments include:

  • Passing more than 336 measures against fracking, wastewater injection and frac-sand mining in communities across the U.S.
  • Passing a moratorium on fracking in the Delaware River Basin Commission
  • Banning fracking in Longmont, CO
  • Passing an indefinite moratorium on fracking in Vermont
  • Upholding bans on fracking in Bulgaria and France, despite intensive pressure from industry
  • Pushing for moratoria in multiple regions in Europe
  • Obtaining local referenda on fracking in Romania, which rejected fracking by more than 90 percent
  • Pushing for a ban on fracking in areas for drinking water provision in Germany
  • Passing moratoria on fracking in the Netherlands and the Czech Republic
  • Organizing to oppose fracking in communities in Argentina, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco and Egypt
  • Spurring the introduction of new laws for assessing unconventional gas impacts in Australia
  • Delaying fracking in South Africa and the Republic of Ireland
  • Forcing the European Union to start analyzing the risks of fracking in Europe
  • Persuading 262 Members of the European Parliament—more than one-third—to vote in favor of an immediate moratorium on shale gas

According to Global Frackdown, the fossil fuel industry is working hard to protect its profits and drown out demand for clean energy, while grassroots organizations around the world are working even harder to raise awareness and protect precious global resources from fracking.

Visit EcoWatch’s FRACKING page for more related news on this topic.

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