Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Global Divestment Day: A Huge Success

Climate
Global Divestment Day: A Huge Success

Global Divestment Day is a huge success with more than 400 events in 48 countries spanning six continents, with events planned for tomorrow too. Global Divestment Day—put on by Fossil Free, a project of 350.org—is bringing people together to stop the fossil fuel industry in its tracks.

When a Fossil Free group demonstrated outside of a Commbank branch, the branch closed. Photo credit: Fossil Free

"Right now, the fossil fuel industry is on the defensive," says Fossil Free. "Today we're demonstrating that there are thousands of people around the world who know that fossil fuel divestment is both the smart thing to do and the right thing ... We know that if it's wrong to wreck the climate, then it's wrong to profit from that wreckage."

There was huge momentum going into today's events with Norway's announcement this month that its sovereign wealth fund will begin to divest from fossil fuels. The move makes it the first country in the world to make this commitment.

Fossil Free groups are encouraging everyone to take the divestment pledge and to push every institution around the world to do the same. So many actions have taken place already, including a group in London setting up a blockade at the International Petroleum Conference and hundreds of Australians dumping their dirty banks.

People singing and dancing about breaking up with fossil fuels in Adelaide, Australia. Photo credit: Fossil Free

Fossil Free is encouraging people to post their photos to Facebook and include #divest in their tweets. Click here to see "one big, glorious, fast-moving social media feed" as Fossil Free tracks events from around the world.

The residents of Tacloban, the Philippines, which was ravaged by Typhoon Haiyan, ask Pope Francis to 'light the way' with a fossil-free Vatican. Photo credit: Fossil Free

From Toronto to Luxembourg, from the Philippines to Boston, people are using this Valentine's Day weekend to show their love for the planet and to tell fossil fuels, "It's over."

Despite the cold and the record snow, Bostonians stood outside the Massachusetts State House to demand climate action.

The fossil fuel industry has made some pathetic attempts to attack the divestment movement. Watch here:

But climate activists are fighting back. Watch Fossil Free's hilarious spoof on the fossil fuel industry's recent PR video. And go here for the best fossil fuel breakup lines.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

NASA Scientists: Future Megadroughts Could Last 30+ Years ‘Thanks to Human-Induced Climate Change’

Thousands to Rally Today Against Taiji Dolphin Slaughter for “World Love for Dolphins Day”

23-Year-Old Hasn’t Produced Any Garbage in Two Years

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Atlantic puffins courting at Maine Coastal Island National Wildlife Refuge in 2009. USFWS / Flickr

When Europeans first arrived in North America, Atlantic puffins were common on islands in the Gulf of Maine. But hunters killed many of the birds for food or for feathers to adorn ladies' hats. By the 1800s, the population in Maine had plummeted.

Read More Show Less
Rescue workers dig through the rubble following a gas explosion in Baltimore, Maryland on Aug. 10, 2020. J. Countess / Getty Images

A "major" natural gas explosion killed two people and seriously injured at least seven in Baltimore, Maryland Monday morning.

Read More Show Less
The recalled list includes red, yellow, white and sweet yellow onions, which may be tainted with salmonella. Pxhere

Nearly 900 people across the U.S. and Canada have been sickened by salmonella linked to onions distributed by Thomson International, the The New York Times reported.

Read More Show Less
Methane flares at a fracking site near a home in Colorado on Oct. 25, 2014. WildEarth Guardians / Flickr

In the coming days, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is expected to use its power to roll back yet another Obama-era environmental protection meant to curb air pollution and slow the climate crisis.

Read More Show Less
Researchers on the ICESCAPE mission, funded by NASA, examine melt ponds and their surrounding ice in 2011 to see how changing conditions in the Arctic affect the biological and chemical makeup of the ocean. NASA / Flickr

By Alex Kirby

The temperature of the Arctic matters to the entire world: it helps to keep the global climate fairly cool. Scientists now say that by 2035 there could be an end to Arctic sea ice.

Read More Show Less
President Vladimir Putin is seen enjoying the Opening Ceremony of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia. Pascal Le Segretain / Getty Images

Russia's Health Ministry has given regulatory approval for the world's first COVID-19 vaccine after less than two months of human testing, President Vladimir Putin said on Tuesday.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A John Deere agricultural tractor sits under a collapsed building following a derecho storm on Aug. 10, 2020 near Franklin Grove, Illinois. Daniel Acker / Getty Images

A powerful series of thunderstorms roared across the Midwest on Monday, downing trees, damaging structures and knocking out power to more than a million people.

Read More Show Less