Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

4 Million Attend Biggest Climate Protest in History, Organizers Declare 'We're Not Through'

Climate
Activist Greta Thunberg leads the Youth Climate Strike on Sept. 20, 2019 in New York City. Roy Rochlin / WireImage / Getty Images

By Julia Conley

As organizers behind Friday's Global Climate Strike reported that four million children and adults attended marches and rallies all over the world — making it the biggest climate protest ever — they assured leaders who have been reticent to take bold climate action that the campaigners' work is far from over.


The Global Climate Strike was just the first day in a week of public actions ahead of the U.N. Climate Action Summit.

On Saturday, the group shared images of more demonstrations being held in countries including Kenya, France and Indonesia.

Young climate action leaders who helped to bring the Global Climate Strike to fruition are gathering Saturday at the U.N. in New York for a historic Youth Climate Summit. Sixteen-year-old Greta Thunberg, who held the first one-person climate strike a year ago in Sweden; 17-year-old Xiye Bastida; and 14-year-old Alexandria Villaseñor will speak at the event.

As world leaders attend the U.N. Climate Action Summit on Monday, campaigners are planning dozens of events for the coming week to demand concrete action from policymakers to begin a rapid shift to a renewable energy economy.

350.org, one of the organizations behind the Global Climate Strike, reported late Friday that in the U.S. alone, 600,000 people attended actions in their communities to kick off the week of action. An estimated 300,000 attended the strike in New York City.

Strikes were held in 185 countries, with 1.4 million people walking out of their workplaces and classrooms across Germany and 330,000 attending actions all over Australia.

"Today we saw a movement, made up of people from all ages and backgrounds coming together and calling for the end of coal, oil and gas," said May Boeve, executive director of 350.org. "September 20th was a demonstration of intent, of 4 million people who took time off from work or school to say that they are ready. Ready to move on and make the changes we need for a future free from fossil fuels and based in climate equity and justice."

"Today's demonstrations mark the beginning of a global mobilization which will span until next Friday, September 27th," Boeve added.

Reposted with permission from our media associate Common Dreams.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

The Earth's atmosphere. NASA

By Jeremy Deaton

You may have heard about the hole in the ozone layer, which hovers over Antarctica. It has shrunk over time thanks to policies that curbed the use of ozone-depleting chemicals. In the nearly 40 years that NASA has kept track, it has never been smaller. That's the good news.

Read More Show Less
Garden interns learn plant and weed identification at the Cheyenne River Youth Project in Eagle Butte, South Dakota. Cheyenne River Youth Project / Facebook

By Stephanie Woodard

Many Americans are now experiencing an erratic food supply for the first time. Among COVID-19's disruptions are bare supermarket shelves and items available yesterday but nowhere to be found today. As you seek ways to replace them, you can look to Native gardens for ideas and inspiration.

Read More Show Less
Although considered safe overall, aloe vera does carry the risk of making some skin rashes worse. serezniy / Getty Images

By Kristeen Cherney

Skin inflammation, which includes swelling and redness, occurs as an immune system reaction. While redness and swelling can develop for a variety of reasons, rashes and burns are perhaps the most common symptoms. More severe skin inflammation can require medications, but sometimes mild rashes may be aided with home remedies like aloe vera.

Read More Show Less
There are plenty of things you can do every day to help reduce greenhouse gases and your carbon footprint to make a less harmful impact on the environment. ipopba / Getty Images

By Katie Lambert and Sarah Gleim

The United Nations suggests that climate change is not just the defining issue of our time, but we are also at a defining moment in history. Weather patterns are changing and will threaten food production, and sea levels are rising and could cause catastrophic flooding across the globe. Countries must make drastic actions to avoid a future with irreversible damage to major ecosystems and planetary climate.

Read More Show Less
Petri Oeschger / Moment / Getty Images

By Kris Gunnars, BSc

Sleep is one of the pillars of optimal health.

Read More Show Less

Junjira Konsang / Pixabay

By Matt Casale

For many Americans across the country, staying home to stop the spread of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) means adapting to long-term telework for the first time. We're doing a lot more video conferencing and working out all the kinks that come along with it.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Looking south from New York City's Central Park. Ajay Suresh / Wikipedia / CC BY 4.0

By Richard leBrasseur

The COVID-19 pandemic has altered humans' relationship with natural landscapes in ways that may be long-lasting. One of its most direct effects on people's daily lives is reduced access to public parks.

Read More Show Less