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These Giant Portraits Will Stand in the Path of Trans Mountain Pipeline

Energy
Climate Justice Edmonton

By Andrea Germanos

To put forth a "hopeful vision for the future" that includes bold climate action, a new installation project is to be erected along the controversial Trans Mountain pipeline expansion route to harnesses art's ability to be a force for social change and highlight the fossil fuel project's increased threats to indigenous rights and a safe climate.


Called "People on the Path" and launched Sunday, the project organized by Climate Justice Edmonton features larger-than-life portraits of numerous Albertans from varying walks of life, with their bodies displaying messages such as "No justice on stolen land" and "For my daughter 100% renewable energy."

Part of the goal, organizers explained at the launch at Whitemud Park in Edmonton, is also to "dismantle the myth that everyone in this province is pro-oil."

The Edmonton Journal reported that the full series, which will include 25 portraits, will go up this fall. CBC added that it "will be exhibited around the city and then placed along the route of the proposed Trans Mountain pipeline expansion—through Edmonton, under the river, and west to Jasper."



"Together," the Climate Justice Edmonton stated on its Facebook page, "these portraits are a powerful statement of the future we want to build—one which respects Indigenous rights, puts workers first, and honors our international climate commitments. We can't build this future if we build new pipelines."

Reposted with permission from our media associate Common Dreams.

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