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Geoffrey Sea

Geoffrey Sea

Geoffrey Sea is a writer, historian and preservationist in Sargents Station, Ohio. He received his A.B. degree magna cum laude in history and science from Harvard College and did graduate work in various fields of natural and social science at MIT, University of California and Columbia. He has published in the American Scholar, Columbia Journalism Review, the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, and numerous newspapers, and won a Project Censored Award for reporting on human radiation experiments. He has founded and/or directed non-profit organizations including the Atomic Reclamation and Conversion Project, International Foundation on Radiation, Ecology and Health, Southern Ohio Neighbors Group and Sargents Historic Preservation Project. Since 2004, Sea has owned and lived in the Barnes Home, a historic home in Sargents Station, Ohio. He is known for his transmigration theory, an explanation of the ancient earthworks of the Ohio Valley as having been built as path-markers and refuge stations for passenger pigeon flock migrations. 

Sea can be reached at SargentsPigeon@aol.com or follow him on Twitter at @GeoffreySea.

Oil spills, such as the one in Mauritius in August 2020, could soon be among the ecological crimes considered ecocide. - / AFP / Getty Images

By Kenny Stancil

An expert panel of top international and environmental lawyers have begun working this month on a legal definition of "ecocide" with the goal of making mass ecological damage an enforceable international crime on par with war crimes, crimes against humanity, and genocide.

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Polar bears are seen in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska. Alan D. Wilson / Wikimedia Commons / CC by 3.0

After ongoing pressure from environmental groups and Indigenous communities, Bank of America has said it will not finance any oil and gas exploration in the Arctic, making it the last major U.S. financial institution to do so.

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Map shows tracks and strength of Atlantic tropical cyclones in 2020. Blues are tropical depressions and tropical storms; yellow through red show hurricanes, darker shades meaning stronger ones. Master0Garfield / Wikimedia Commons

By Astrid Caldas

As we reach the official end of hurricane season, 2020 will be one for the record books. Looking back at these long, surprising, sometimes downright crazy past six months (seven if you count when the first named storms actually started forming), there are many noteworthy statistics and patterns that drive home the significance of this hurricane season, and the ways climate change may have contributed to it.

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Protesters shouting slogans on megaphones during the climate strike on September 25 in Lisbon, Portugal. Hugo Amaral / SOPA Images / LightRocket / Getty Images

By Dana Drugmand

An unprecedented climate lawsuit brought by six Portuguese youths is to be fast-tracked at Europe's highest court, it was announced today.

The European Court of Human Rights said the case, which accuses 33 European nations of violating the applicants' right to life by disregarding the climate emergency, would be granted priority status due to the "importance and urgency of the issues raised."

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A child plays with a planet Earth ball during the Extinction Rebellion Strike in London on Apr. 18, 2019. Brais G. Rouco / SOPA Images / LightRocket / Getty Images

Will concern over the climate crisis stop people from having children?

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