Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

GE Salmon Clears Another Hurdle

GMO
GE Salmon Clears Another Hurdle

Food & Water Watch

There’s some unfortunate news on the genetically engineered (GE) salmon front. According to Jim Kozubek of TPM’s Idea Lab, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has completed its environmental assessment of AquaBounty’s AquAdvantage GE salmon, has recommended approving it for commercial use, and has sent along some of its documents to the White House for review.

This means that GE salmon has passed another hurdle in the approval process, which makes it more urgent than ever that we all take action. The FDA had a choice of either conducting an environmental assessment of GE salmon—an easier, simplified route—or producing an environmental impact statement, which is a much more thorough process that would consider all potential risks more thoughtfully.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture recently gave AquaBounty Technologies, Inc., $494,000 to do more research about sterilization techniques for genetically engineered fish, which was rather surprising considering that AquaBounty initially claimed their GE salmon were sterile and that there would be no chance of GE salmon endangering wild salmon through breeding. This seems like yet another example of how the FDA has been trying to rush this process without carefully considering GE salmon’s true potential impact.

We need to make a strong appeal directly to Congress to ban GE salmon due to the environmental and public health risks this food experiment poses. There are still far too many concerns that have not been addressed.

Ask your member of Congress to call upon the Obama administration to ban GE salmon.

For more information, click here.

A hiker looking up at a Redwood tree in Redwoods State Park. Rich Wheater / Getty Images
By Douglas Broom
  • Redwoods are the world's tallest trees.
  • Now scientists have discovered they are even bigger than we thought.
  • Using laser technology they map the 80-meter giants.
  • Trees are a key plank in the fight against climate change.

They are among the largest trees in the world, descendants of forests where dinosaurs roamed.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A female condor above the Hopper Mountain National Wildlife Refuge in Ventura County, California. Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

One environmental downside to wind turbines is their impact on birds.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Kentucky received record-breaking rainfall and flooding this past weekend. Keith Getter / Getty Images

Kentucky is coping with historic flooding after a weekend of record-breaking rainfall, enduring water rescues, evacuations and emergency declarations.

Read More Show Less
The Forest Vixen's CC Photo Stream. Flickr / CC BY 2.0

Spring is coming. And soon, tree swallows will start building nests. But as the climate changes, the birds are nesting earlier in the spring.

Read More Show Less
An Exxon oil refinery is seen at night. Jim Sugar / Getty Images

Citigroup will strive to reach net-zero greenhouse gas pollution across its lending portfolio by 2050 and in its own operations by 2030, the investment group announced Monday.

Read More Show Less