Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

From the Mouth of Babes: President Obama, End Mountaintop Removal Now

Energy

Appalachian Voices

In Appalachia, children are 42 percent more likely to have birth defects if they live near a mountaintop removal coal mine.

More people are likely to die from cardiovascular disease, and 50 percent are more likely to die of cancer—if they live near one of these sites of utter destruction.

What if those were your loved ones? That is the question posed in a new video released today by Appalachian Voices with a strong message to President Obama: No more excuses. End mountaintop removal now

The two-minute video features children giving a basic science lesson about the health and environmental impacts of blowing up mountains and dumping the dirt and rubble into nearby headwater streams. The children describe how the explosions send huge clouds of dirt and dust in the air, and how the mining operations pollute drinking water sources.

“Arsenic, mercury, selenium, lead, magnesium, hydrogen sulfide …” are a few of the toxic compounds the children cite that contribute to a range of health impacts in the coal-mining regions of Appalachia.

The video was produced by Appalachian Voices for ILoveMountains.org, a campaign of a broad coalition of regional groups, the Alliance for Appalachia, to focus national attention on the tragedy of mountaintop removal, which has destroyed more than 500 of America’s oldest mountains and buried or poisoned more than 2,000 miles of streams.

The video ends with the children directly addressing President Obama to tell him “No more excuses—end mountaintop removal. Now.”  Viewers are directed to the ILoveMountains.org website where they can email the president, sign a petition and share the video. The website also links to a brochure summarizing more than 20 peer-reviewed studies concluding that mountaintop removal coal mining contributes to significantly higher rates of birth defects, cancer, cardiovascular and respiratory diseases in those communities.

Visit EcoWatch’s MOUNTAINTOP REMOVAL page for more related news on this topic.

 

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

The CDC has emphasized that washing hands with soap and water is one of the most effective ways to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Guido Mieth / Moment / Getty Images

The Centers for Disease Control has emphasized that washing hands with soap and water is one of the most effective measures we can take in preventing the spread of COVID-19. However, millions of Americans in some of the most vulnerable communities face the prospect of having their water shut off during the lockdowns, according to The Guardian.

Read More Show Less
A California newt (Taricha torosa) from Napa County, California, USA. Connor Long / CC BY-SA 3.0

Aerial photos of the Sierra Nevada — the long mountain range stretching down the spine of California — showed rust-colored swathes following the state's record-breaking five-year drought that ended in 2016. The 100 million dead trees were one of the most visible examples of the ecological toll the drought had wrought.

Now, a few years later, we're starting to learn about how smaller, less noticeable species were affected.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Disinfectants and cleaners claiming to sanitize against the novel coronavirus have started to flood the market.
Natthawat / Moment / Getty Images

Disinfectants and cleaners claiming to sanitize against the novel coronavirus have started to flood the market, raising concerns for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), which threatened legal recourse against retailers selling unregistered products, according to The New York Times.

Read More Show Less
A customer packs groceries in reusable bags at a NYC supermarket on March 1, 2020. Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/Getty Images

The global coronavirus pandemic has thrown our daily routine into disarray. Billions are housebound, social contact is off-limits and an invisible virus makes up look at the outside world with suspicion. No surprise, then, that sustainability and the climate movement aren't exactly a priority for many these days.

Read More Show Less
Ingredients are displayed for the Old School Pinto Beans from the Decolonize Your Diet cookbook by Luz Calvo and Catriona Rueda Esquibel. Melissa Renwick / Toronto Star via Getty Images

By Molly Matthews Multedo

Livestock farming contributes to global warming, so eating less meat can be better for the climate.

Read More Show Less