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From Fracking to Renewable Energy, Interactive Website Tracks Legislation State by State

Energy
From Fracking to Renewable Energy, Interactive Website Tracks Legislation State by State

Center for the New Energy Economy

Colorado State University’s Center for the New Energy Economy (CNEE) announced the rollout of the Advanced Energy Legislation Tracker (AEL)—a new online database of energy-related state legislation pending in all 50 states, from solar to natural gas and everything in between. This first-of-its-kind database, created in partnership with Advanced Energy Economy (AEE), will also enable CNEE to conduct analysis of trends in state energy legislation.

State legislatures are considering more than 2,100 bills that could change the way Americans produce, buy and use energy. AEL Tracker identifies all those measures and monitors the progress of many advanced energy bills as they move forward.

“If we look at where the country is going on advanced energy policy, overwhelmingly that transition is being led by states,” said Bill Ritter, Jr., director of CNEE and former governor of Colorado.

“To get the pulse of where the country is going we need to understand what the states are doing. AEL Tracker brings together information on energy-related legislation in all 50 states, in a form that is easily accessible not only to lawmakers at all levels of government, but to academics, analysts, environmentalists, funders, business leaders and the general public. It will allow our center to conduct critical academic analysis of issues related to energy legislation nationwide.”

Based on information available only in AEL Tracker:

  • Nearly 25 percent of pending state energy legislation call for new financing tools—including tax incentives—for the installation of energy facilities.
  • Roughly 21 percent of pending bills promote development of clean energy sources.
  • About eight percent encourages adoption of energy-efficient appliances, building codes and practices—the low-hanging fruit in America’s energy supply chain.

The center’s first trend analysis, Rediscovering the First Fuel, is on energy efficiency. The center expects to publish two to three trend analyses per month and will next publish a white paper on financing of advanced energy.

The database has been developed in collaboration with AEE, a national business organization representing the entire advanced energy industry, from wind, hydro, solar and natural gas to efficiency and electric vehicles.

“This online database provides information on critical state legislation that is available nowhere else,” said Graham Richard, CEO of AEE. “AEL Tracker is a nonpartisan tool that allows researchers, journalists, policymakers and concerned citizens to follow and analyze advanced energy legislation, individually and in aggregate. We hope this unique database will increase awareness of advanced energy and the way state action can unleash its economic potential for the United States.”

CNEE operates the database on the Fort Collins campus of Colorado State University, a land-grant university with a long history of cutting-edge research into natural gas emissions and renewable energy, water resources and the environment.

Visit EcoWatch’s ENERGY page for more related news on this topic.

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