Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Watch Guinness World Record Holder's Stunning Free Dive Under Arctic Ice

Adventure
Watch Guinness World Record Holder's Stunning Free Dive Under Arctic Ice

"My leg was so badly broken, they thought I might lose it," Finnish free diver Johanna Nordblad says in a soothing voice in the opening of a stunning short documentary from British director Ian Derry.

After a terrible downhill biking accident in which Norblad nearly lost her leg to necrosis, she began a cold water treatment of free diving under the Arctic ice that changed her life and saved her leg.

Screenshot from short film / Vimeo

"At first, I did not like it—the cold was agony," she says in the short film. "But slowly, I got used to the feeling."

In March 2015, Norblad set the Guinness World Record after completing a 164-foot free dive horizontally under the ice wearing only a swimsuit and a mask at Lake Päijänne in Finland.

Derry told Nowness, he found out about Nordblad from her sister who is a photographer and when he met her and went to the location—which at that point was -24C—he knew he had to make the film.

"The environment and the silence there is something I will never forget," he said.

Underneath that location—a remote spot in the Arctic landscape—is what Nordblad describes as a "different world, a world so peaceful, so beautiful, endless and desolate" where "with one breath, I'm part of it."

Watch here:

In an ad released by Republican Voters Against Trump, former coronavirus task force member Olivia Troye roasted the president for his response. Republican Voters Against Trump / YouTube

Yet another former Trump administration staffer has come out with an endorsement for former Vice President Joe Biden, this time in response to President Donald Trump's handling of the coronavirus pandemic.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Climate Group

Every September for the past 11 years, non-profit the Climate Group has hosted Climate Week NYC, a chance for business, government, activist and community leaders to come together and discuss solutions to the climate crisis.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A field of sunflowers near the Mehrum coal-fired power station, wind turbines and high-voltage lines in the Peine district of Germany on Aug. 3, 2020. Julian Stratenschulte / picture alliance via Getty Images

By Elliot Douglas

The coronavirus pandemic has altered economic priorities for governments around the world. But as wildfires tear up the west coast of the United States and Europe reels after one of its hottest summers on record, tackling climate change remains at the forefront of economic policy.

Read More Show Less
Monarch butterflies in Mexico's Oyamel forest in Michoacan, Mexico after migrating from Canada. Luis Acosta / AFP / Getty Images

By D. André Green II

One of nature's epic events is underway: Monarch butterflies' fall migration. Departing from all across the United States and Canada, the butterflies travel up to 2,500 miles to cluster at the same locations in Mexico or along the Pacific Coast where their great-grandparents spent the previous winter.

Read More Show Less
The 30th First Annual Ig Nobel Prize Ceremony on Sept. 17 introduced ten new Ig Nobel Prize winners, each intended to make people "laugh then think." Improbable Research / YouTube

The annual Ig Nobel prizes were awarded Thursday by the science humor magazine Annals of Improbable Research for scientific experiments that seem somewhat absurd, but are also thought-provoking. This was the 30th year the awards have been presented, but the first time they were not presented at Harvard University. Instead, they were delivered in a 75-minute pre-recorded ceremony.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch