Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Watch Al Franken, David Letterman Team Up to Fight Climate Change

Climate
www.facebook.com

Former comedian and current Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.) has teamed up with David Letterman to produce a new digital series to make serious conversations about climate change a little funnier.

The series, "Boiling the Frog with Senator Al Franken," is coproduced by Years of Living Dangerously and Funny or Die, and consists of six five-minute episodes.


"To me, people ought to be aware of this [issue], people ought to have this tucked in their wallet," Letterman told the AP. "People ought to walk around with this every day in the back of their mind and people ought to be aware and be educated and looking forward to things that they might do to help their kids and their children's kids."

For Sen. Franken, it's an effort to "fight back" against the creeping apathy and disregard toward science and climate change, the AP reported.

"Since taking office, President Trump has decided to disregard science in order to repeatedly put the short-sighted interests of his friends in the fossil fuel industry ahead of the safety of our planet," Franken said.

"We hope to bring some much needed attention to this critical issue and ultimately, to help encourage people in Minnesota, Dave's home state of Indiana and all Americans to make their voices heard and join the fight to combat climate change."

For a deeper dive:

AP, USA Today, Rolling Stone, Mother Jones, Washington Free Beacon. Commentary: ThinkProgress, Joe Romm column

For more climate change and clean energy news, you can follow Climate Nexus on Twitter and Facebook, and sign up for daily Hot News.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Marco Bottigelli / Moment / Getty Images

By James Shulmeister

Climate Explained is a collaboration between The Conversation, Stuff and the New Zealand Science Media Centre to answer your questions about climate change.

If you have a question you'd like an expert to answer, please send it to climate.change@stuff.co.nz

Read More Show Less
Luxy Images / Getty Images

By Jo Harper

Investment in U.S. offshore wind projects are set to hit $78 billion (€69 billion) this decade, in contrast with an estimated $82 billion for U.S. offshore oil and gasoline projects, Wood Mackenzie data shows. This would be a remarkable feat only four years after the first offshore wind plant — the 30 megawatt (MW) Block Island Wind Farm off the coast of Rhode Island — started operating in U.S. waters.

Read More Show Less
Giacomo Berardi / Unsplash

The COVID-19 pandemic has revealed both the strengths and limitations of globalization. The crisis has made people aware of how industrialized food production can be, and just how far food can travel to get to the local supermarket. There are many benefits to this system, including low prices for consumers and larger, even global, markets for producers. But there are also costs — to the environment, workers, small farmers and to a region or individual nation's food security.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Joe Leech

The human body comprises around 60% water.

It's commonly recommended that you drink eight 8-ounce (237-mL) glasses of water per day (the 8×8 rule).

Read More Show Less

By Michael Svoboda

The enduring pandemic will make conventional forms of travel difficult if not impossible this summer. As a result, many will consider virtual alternatives for their vacations, including one of the oldest forms of virtual reality – books.

Read More Show Less
Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility on Thursday accused NOAA of ignoring its own scientists' findings about the endangerment of the North Atlantic right whale. Lauren Packard / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

By Julia Conley

As the North Atlantic right whale was placed on the International Union for Conservation of Nature's list of critically endangered species Thursday, environmental protection groups accusing the U.S. government of bowing to fishing and fossil fuel industry pressure to downplay the threat and failing to enact common-sense restrictions to protect the animals.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Pexels

By Beth Ann Mayer

Since even moderate-intensity workouts offer a slew of benefits, walking is a good choice for people looking to stay healthy.

Read More Show Less