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Fracking Videos Highlight Impacts of Shale Gas Drilling

Energy

Delaware Riverkeeper Network

Fracking Could Put Farmers and Wineries Out of Business.

Farmers and other businesses who depend on clean water and land could have their livelihoods destroyed by shale gas drilling operations. A number of small family owned businesses in the Delaware River watershed are worried about their future if fracking is permitted in their community.

Fracking Threatens Wildlife

Researchers are concerned about the effects of shale gas extraction on threatened and endangered species. Brown bat populations have been decimated by one illness and the animals could see a loss of important habitat from fracking operations. In the Delaware River watershed there are concerns about two species whose numbers have been dropping.

Shale Gas Pipelines Destroy Important Habitat

Pipeline construction for the delivery of shale gas has led to the destruction of important forests, ridges and wetlands. The pipeline routes often run through areas near key habitat. Environmentalists say restoration work conducted by pipeline companies does not repair the damage.

Protestors in Albany send a message, "Don't Frack New York"

On Aug. 26 concerned citizens from around the country converged on Albany to demand Governor Andrew Cuomo keep a ban on fracking in New York.

Visit EcoWatch’s FRACKING page for more related news on this topic.

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