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4 Brands Going Green This Black Friday

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4 Brands Going Green This Black Friday
Motivating slogan "Make Friday Green Again" urges consumers to ignore Black Friday sales. anyaivanova / iStock / Getty Images

Black Friday is one of the busiest shopping days of the year, and the consumption it encourages can take a toll on human and planetary health.


"For people who don't have purchasing power, the ability to be able to buy something that is a necessity at a discounted price is obviously a benefit," MIT professor Nicholas Ashford told National Geographic last year. "For other people with more than enough, it just perpetuates a consumption-oriented society, which has an adverse effect on the environment."

In recent years, however, some companies have come to agree. Here are what four brands are doing to encourage more environmentally-friendly activities for the day after Thanksgiving.

1. REI Opts to Act

The outdoor gear company has closed its doors on Black Friday for five years now, encouraging its customers and employees, who are paid for the day, to #OptOutside and spend time in nature.

Originally, this decision was made for the sake of the company's employees, since Black Friday tends to pull retail workers away from their families, Ben Steele, the company's executive vice president and chief customer officer, told HuffPost.

But this year, REI is adding an environmental component and encouraging its customers to Opt to Act by joining one of the cleanups it has organized around the country with the Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics and United By Blue. The store said those who don't live near a cleanup can still pick up trash while they spend time outdoors.

"Today, that future is at risk," REI CEO and President Eric Artz wrote in a letter announcing the campaign. "We are in the throes of an environmental crisis that threatens not only the next 81 years of the co-op, but the incredible outdoor places that we love. Climate change is the greatest existential threat facing our co-op. I believe we do not have the luxury of calling climate change a political issue. This is a human issue. And we must act now."

2. Deciem Plans a "Moment of Nothingness"

Beauty company Deciem is also making a point this year by closing its stores and website Nov. 29 and implementing a month-long 23 percent discount for every one of its products sold online and in stores.

"Hyper-consumerism poses one of the biggest threats to the planet, and flash sales can often lead to rushed purchasing decisions, driven by the fear of a sell-out," the company wrote in a Nov. 1 Instagram post. "We no longer feel that Black Friday is an earth or consumer-friendly event, and have therefore decided to close our website and stores for a moment of nothingness on the 29th November."

In addition to environmental concerns, Deciem, which owns beauty brands The Ordinary and NIOD, emphasized that it wanted to give customers time to choose the right products.

"We strongly believe that skincare decisions should be based on education rather than impulse, and hope that a month-long promotion will provide the time for research, reflection, and consideration," they wrote.

3. 300+ Clothing Brands Unite to "Make Friday Green Again"

Fast fashion is a major environmental problem. A garbage-truck's worth of textiles is discarded every second, according to an Ellen MacArthur Foundation study. Clothing also sheds more than 50 billion plastic bottles worth of microfibers into the oceans every year. If industry practices don't change, fashion will gobble up a quarter of the world's carbon budget by 2050.

So it's fitting that more than 300 clothing companies are taking Black Friday off, BBC News reported. The Make Friday Green Again collective, whose members are largely French, wants customers to spend the day going through their closets to decide what they can repair, recycle or give away.

"When people buy something, we pollute because of the carbon emissions that come from making that product, from using it and then getting rid of that product," Nicolas Rohr, who started the group and co-founded green clothing company Faguo, told BBC News. "Today we don't buy what we need; we buy because we are tempted. We are not in a good relationship with consumption any more."

4. Patagonia Will Match Your Green Gifts

Outdoor store Patagonia will remain open to shoppers Black Friday, but it is also using this holiday season to encourage a different kind of gift giving.

Starting Nov. 29 and lasting through December, the company will match any donations made to one of environmental groups it supports through Patagonia Action Works, even if the giver doesn't purchase anything from the company. Customers can donate in their own name or as a gift, and the store will provide eCards and cards to print online or physical cards in store.

"Black Friday is often a day when we go out and buy things we don't really need and give them to people who don't really want them," Patagonia CEO Rose Marcario wrote on LinkedIn. "This year, consider giving to our home planet in the name of someone you love."

In her message, Marcario pointed out that environmental groups only receive three percent of charitable giving, despite the urgency of the climate crisis.

She also wasn't above encouraging a little passive-aggressive gift-giving when donating in others' names.

"With a wink and a friendly nudge, you might include those relatives or friends who refuse to believe in climate science," she wrote.

The Elephant in the Room

While these brands are offering a different vision of Black Friday, HuffPost writer Laura Paddison cautioned that the movement away from a door-busting Black Friday doesn't change the underlying culture of consumption that drives environmental harm year round. Both Deciem and REI offered November sales. (REI discounted items by up to 30 percent between Nov. 15 and 25.)

"[T]he elephant in the room here is that, even for companies that work hard to toe an ethical line, a business model predicated on growth means the ultimate aim is always to get people to buy more, which means producing more, which means more resources extracted, and more stuff in the world," she wrote.

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