Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Fossil Fuel Stocks Tumble, Renewable Energy Stocks Soar

Business
Fossil Fuel Stocks Tumble, Renewable Energy Stocks Soar

Fossil fuel stocks tumbled while renewable energy soared on Monday, the first day of trading after global leaders cemented their landmark climate pact in Paris.

Under the agreement, countries have pledged to rapidly reduce greenhouse gas emissions in an effort to keep global warming beneath 1.5 degrees Celsius. And it is clear the fossil fuel industry is feeling the heat.

The first day of trading after global leaders cemented their landmark climate pact in Paris, it is clear the fossil fuel industry is feeling the heat. Photo credit: Pieter Morlion / Flickr

According to Reuters, "The MAC Global Solar Energy Index was up 4.5 percent. The iShares Global Clean Energy exchange-traded fund, which allows investors to trade a basket of renewable energy stocks, rose 1.4 percent." At the same time, shares of companies that produce coal, Peabody Energy Corp and Consol Energy Inc. plummeted 12.6 percent and 3.3 percent respectively.

Portfolio manager Thiemo Lang of Zurich's RobecoSAM, which owns solar stocks, told Reuters the Paris agreement "will help boost the mid- to long-term fundamentals in renewable energy generation, especially solar, while making any further investments in fossil fuels increasingly vulnerable."

Indeed, the movement to divest from fossil fuels has long-argued that investing in polluting industries is both economically and environmentally unwise. Earlier this month, the campaign announced that investors representing more than $3.4 trillion in total assets have pledged to divest their holdings from fossil fuels.

Environmental campaigners, who say that the Paris agreement falls drastically short of what's needed to actually address the climate crisis, maintained throughout the COP21 climate talks that a just transition to renewable energy must continue if the world has any hope of limiting temperature rise.

"Pace is now the key word for climate," said 350.org co-founder Bill McKibben after the agreement was finalized. "Not where we’re going, but how fast we’re going there. Pace—velocity, speed, rate, momentum, tempo. That’s what matters from here on in."

"We know where we’re going now," he continued. "No one can doubt that the fossil fuel age has finally begun to wane and that the sun is now shining on, well, solar. But the question, the only important question, is: how fast?"

McKibben added that the agreement must serve as a floor, not a ceiling, for change.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

San Diego Passes Strongest City-Wide 100% Clean Energy Law in America

3 Things You Need to Know About the Paris Climate Agreement

Watch Colbert Say Goodbye to Fossil Fuels

Leonardo DiCaprio and Greg Barker Join Forces to Bring Solar to Off-Grid Communities

An Edith's Checkerspot butterfly in Los Padres National Forest in Southern California. Patricia Marroquin / Moment / Getty Images

Butterflies across the U.S. West are disappearing, and now researchers say the climate crisis is largely to blame.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A wildfire burns in the Hollywood hills on July 19, 2016 in Hollywood, California. AaronP / Bauer-Griffin / GC Images

California faces another "critically dry year" according to state officials, and a destructive wildfire season looms on its horizon. But in a state that welcomes innovation, water efficacy approaches and drought management could replenish California, increasingly threatened by the climate's new extremes.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Wisdom is seen with her chick in Feb. 2021 at the Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge. Jon Brack / Friends of Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge / Flickr / CC 2.0

Wisdom the mōlī, or Laysan albatross, is the oldest wild bird known to science at the age of at least 70. She is also, as of February 1, a new mother.

Read More Show Less
Wind turbines in Norway. piola66 / E+ / Getty Images

By Hui Hu

Winter is supposed to be the best season for wind power – the winds are stronger, and since air density increases as the temperature drops, more force is pushing on the blades. But winter also comes with a problem: freezing weather.

Read More Show Less
Jaffa Port in Israel. theDOCK innovated the Israeli maritime space and kickstarted a boom in new technologies. Pixabay

While traditional investment in the ocean technology sector has been tentative, growth in Israeli maritime innovations has been exponential in the last few years, and environmental concern has come to the forefront.

Read More Show Less