Quantcast

Earth to Ford: Get Back on Track With Clean Cars

Business
The 2018 Ford Transit, one of Ford's 15 showcased models at the DC Auto Show, gets an estimated 23 mpg according to fueleconomy.gov. washingtonautoshow.com

This week, tens of thousands of people will attend the Washington Auto Show to see the latest that the industry has to offer. However, instead of moving toward a cleaner transportation future, Ford Motor Company and other automakers are working to take us backward: They are lobbying the Trump administration to weaken clean car standards, which curb pollution, save consumers money and protect health.


"After a year of the worst climate change-fueled extreme weather we've ever seen, it's clear that we need to hit the brakes on global warming pollution, and one of our best programs to cut emissions are the clean car standards," said Andrea McGimsey, global warming solutions program director at Environment America. "If Ford is serious about committing to a clean, electric, zero-emission future, it needs to step up and publicly support the clean car standards."

While Ford largely supported stronger fuel efficiency and emissions standards enacted during the Obama administration, it has taken a different approach since the election of Donald Trump.

"Ford may be trying to put on a good show, but behind closed doors, it has been working with Donald Trump and Scott Pruitt to roll back our single biggest defense against dangerous climate pollution," said Sierra Club's deputy legislative director, Andrew Linhardt. "Ford's claims of sustainability in its advertising and here at the auto show are nothing more than greenwashing. If Ford wants to back up its claims, it would be arguing to put clean car standards in the fast lane, strengthening them to protect our health and our climate rather than undermining them."

In 2011, automakers, labor groups and environmentalists stood beside President Barack Obama as he announced the new clean car standards.The rules already are delivering benefits, already having saved Americans more than $53 billion and, if enforced as written, will ensure that:

  • Individual consumers will save $3,200 to $5,700 in fuel costs over the life of their vehicle.
  • Six billion metric tons of tailpipe climate pollution—the equivalent of a year's worth of pollution from 150 power plants—will be kept from the atmosphere.
"Ford made a promise to the American people back in 2011: to put cleaner cars on the road. We're here today to demand that the company fulfills that promise, and we'll keep up the pressure until they do," said Natalie Nava, project leader at Greenpeace USA. "Ford's feel-good PR statements about their commitment to fight climate change will not distract us from the fact that the company is fighting a standard that would help them do just that."

"Making clean vehicles is auto mechanics, not rocket science: Ford can save drivers gas and slash air pollution," said Dan Becker, director of the Safe Climate Campaign. "Instead, Ford announced that it will make more gas-guzzling SUVs and other trucks while it works with President Trump to roll back clean car standards."

Despite a recent announcement to invest in electric vehicles, Ford isn't showcasing any of its electric models at the auto show.

Madeline Page, campaign coordinator with Public Citizen said, "Search the Washington auto show website to see what electric vehicles will be on display this week, and you'll get this message: 'Sorry, the search criteria returned 0 results.' It's further evidence that Ford's desperate attempts to flex its green credentials in the media is just that, talk. It may be too late to pack the convention center with clean vehicles, but we will continue to call out Ford's hypocrisy and push the company to halt efforts to roll back the clean car standards."

The rules are popular. A Natural Resources Defense Council poll found that 79 percent of Americans want the government to increase standards. Moreover, a 2016 technical assessment by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the California Air Resources Board shows that automakers are meeting the standards more affordably and faster than predicted.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Matt Cardy / Stringer / Getty Images

The Guardian is changing the way it writes about environmental issues.

Read More Show Less
Blueberry yogurt bark. SEE D JAN / iStock / Getty Images Plus

By Lizzie Streit, MS, RDN, LD

Having nutritious snacks to eat during the workday can help you stay energized and productive.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
A 2017 flood in Elk Grove, California. Florence Low / California Department of Water Resources

By Tara Lohan

It's been the wettest 12 months on record in the continental United States. Parts of the High Plains and Midwest are still reeling from deadly, destructive and expensive spring floods — some of which have lasted for three months.

Mounting bills from natural disasters like these have prompted renewed calls to reform the National Flood Insurance Program, which is managed by Federal Emergency Management Agency and is now $20 billion in debt.

Read More Show Less
Jennifer A. Smith / Moment / Getty Images

By Brenda Ekwurzel

When temperatures hit the 80s Fahrenheit in May above latitude 40, sun-seekers hit the parks, lakes, and beaches, and thoughts turn to summer. By contrast, when temperatures lurk in the drizzly 40s and 50s well into flower season, northerners get impatient for summer. But when those 80-degree temperatures visit latitude 64 in Russia, as they just did, and when sleet disrupts Mother's Day weekend in May in Massachusetts, as it just did, thoughts turn to: what is going on here?

Read More Show Less
Shrimp fishing along the coast of Nayarit, Mexico. Tomas Castelazo / Wikimedia, CC BY-SA

By Paula Ezcurra and Octavio Aburto

Thousands of hydroelectric dams are under construction around the world, mainly in developing countries. These enormous structures are one of the world's largest sources of renewable energy, but they also cause environmental problems.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Activists in North Dakota confront pipeline construction activities. A Texas bill would impose steep penalties for such protests. Speak Freely / ACLU

By Eoin Higgins

A bill making its way through the Texas legislature would make protesting pipelines a third-degree felony, the same as attempted murder.

Read More Show Less
An Australian flag flutters in the wind in a dry drought-ridden landscape. Virginia Star / Moment / Getty Images

Australia re-elected its conservative governing Liberal-National coalition Saturday, despite the fact that it has refused to cut down significantly on greenhouse gas emissions or coal during its time in power, The New York Times reported.

Read More Show Less
Tree lined street, UK. Richard Newstead / Moment / Getty Images

The UK government will fund the planting of more than 130,000 trees in English towns and cities in the next two years as part of its efforts to fight climate change, The Guardian reported Sunday.

Read More Show Less