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Powerful Antioxidants: 20 Foods High in Vitamin E

Health + Wellness
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By Dr. Atli Arnarson

Vitamin E is a group of powerful antioxidants that protect your cells from oxidative stress. Adequate vitamin E levels are essential for the body to function normally.


If you don't get enough, you may become more prone to infections, experience impaired eyesight or suffer from muscle weakness.

Fortunately, vitamin E is widespread in foods. As a result, you are unlikely to become deficient unless your nutrient absorption is impaired.

Nevertheless, everyone should try to eat plenty of whole foods rich in vitamin E.

In the U.S., 15 mg of vitamin E per day is considered enough for the vast majority of adults. This daily value (DV) is selected as a reference on nutrition labels in the US and Canada.

Below is a list of 20 foods that are high in alpha-tocopherol, which is the most active form of vitamin E (1).

This article also provides five lists of vitamin-E-rich foods, categorized by food group.

20 Foods High in Vitamin E

Vitamin E is a common nutrient found in most foods. A few foods, including cooking oils, seeds and nuts, are exceptionally rich sources.

1. Wheat Germ Oil—135 percent DV per serving

1 tablespoon: 20 mg (135 percent DV)
100 grams: 149 mg (996 percent DV)

2. Sunflower Seeds—66 percent DV per serving

1 ounce: 10 mg (66 percent DV)
100 grams: 35 mg (234 percent DV)

3. Almonds—48 percent DV per serving

1 ounce: 7.3 mg (48 percent DV)
100 grams: 26 mg (171 percent DV)

4. Hazelnut Oil—43 percent DV per serving

1 tablespoon: 6.4 mg (43 percent DV)
100 grams: 47 mg (315 percent DV)

5. Mamey Sapote—39 percent DV per serving

Half a fruit: 5.9 mg (39 percent DV)
100 grams: 2.1 mg (14 percent DV)

6. Sunflower Oil—37 percent DV per serving

1 tablespoon: 5.6 mg (37 percent DV)
100 grams: 41 mg (274 percent DV)

7. Almond Oil—36 percent DV per serving

1 tablespoon: 5.3 mg (36 percent DV)
100 grams: 39 mg (261 percent DV)

8. Hazelnuts—28 percent DV per serving

1 ounce: 4.3 mg (28 percent DV)
100 grams: 15 mg (100 percent DV)

9. Abalone—23 percent DV per serving

3 ounces: 3.4 mg (23 percent DV)
100 grams: 4.0 mg (27 percent DV)

10. Pine Nuts—18 percent DV per serving

1 ounce: 2.7 mg (18 percent DV)
100 grams: 9.3 mg (62 percent DV)

11. Goose Meat—16 percent DV per serving

1 cup: 2.4 mg (16 percent DV)
100 grams: 1.7 mg (12 percent DV)

12. Peanuts—16 percent DV per serving

1 ounce: 2.4 mg (16 percent DV)
100 grams: 8.3 mg (56 percent DV)

13. Atlantic Salmon—14 percent DV per serving

Half a fillet: 2.0 mg (14 percent DV)
100 grams: 1.1 mg (8 percent DV)

14. Avocado—14 percent DV per serving

Half a fruit: 2.1 mg (14 percent DV)
100 grams: 2.1 mg (14 percent DV)

15. Rainbow Trout—13 percent DV per serving

1 fillet: 2.0 mg (13 percent DV)
100 grams: 2.8 mg (19 percent DV)

16. Red Sweet Pepper (raw)—13 percent DV per serving

1 medium pepper: 1.9 mg (13 percent DV)
100 grams: 1.6 mg (11 percent DV)

17. Brazil Nuts—11 percent DV per serving

1 ounce: 1.6 mg (11 percent DV)
100 grams: 5.7 mg (38 percent DV)

18. Mango—10 percent DV per serving

Half a fruit: 1.5 mg (10 percent DV)
100 grams: 0.9 mg (6 percent DV)

19. Turnip Greens (raw)—10 percent DV per serving

1 cup: 1.6 mg (10 percent DV)
100 grams: 2.9 mg (19 percent DV)

20. Kiwifruit—7 percent DV per serving

1 medium fruit: 1.0 mg (7 percent DV)
100 grams: 1.5 mg (10 percent DV)

10 Animal Products High in Vitamin E

Many animal-based foods are also good sources of vitamin E.

1. Abalone—23 percent DV per serving

3 ounces: 3.4 mg (23 percent DV)
100 grams: 4.0 mg (27 percent DV)

2. Goose Meat—16 percent DV per serving

1 cup: 2.4 mg (16 percent DV)
100 grams: 1.7 mg (12 percent DV)

3. Atlantic Salmon—14 percent DV per serving

Half a fillet: 2.0 mg (14 percent DV)
100 grams: 1.1 mg (8 percent DV)

4. Rainbow Trout—13 percent DV per serving

1 fillet: 2.0 mg (13 percent DV)
100 grams: 2.8 mg (19 percent DV)

5. Snails—9 percent DV per serving

1 ounce: 1.4 mg (9 percent DV)
100 grams: 5.0 mg (33 percent DV)

6. Crayfish—8 percent DV per serving

3 ounces: 1.3 mg (8 percent DV)
100 grams: 1.5 mg (10 percent DV)

7. Fish Roe—7 percent DV per serving

1 tablespoon: 1.0 mg (7 percent DV)
100 grams: 7.0 mg (47 percent DV)

8. Octopus—7 percent DV per serving

3 ounces: 1.0 mg (7 percent DV)
100 grams: 1.2 mg (8 percent DV)

9. Lobster—6 percent DV per serving

3 ounces: 0.9 mg (6 percent DV)
100 grams: 1.0 mg (7 percent DV)

10. Cod (dried)—5 percent DV per serving

1 ounce: 0.8 mg (5 percent DV)
100 grams: 2.8 mg (19 percent DV)

10 Seeds and Nuts High in Vitamin E

Seeds and nuts are among the best sources of vitamin E.

Below are some of the richest sources of alpha-tocopherol. Many of these seeds and nuts are also high in other forms of vitamin E, such as gamma-tocopherol.

1. Sunflower Seeds—66 percent DV per serving

1 ounce: 10 mg (66 percent DV)
100 grams: 35 mg (234 percent DV)

2. Almonds—48 percent DV per serving

1 ounce: 7.3 mg (48 percent DV)
100 grams: 26 mg (171 percent DV)

3. Hazelnuts—28 percent DV per serving

1 ounce: 4.3 mg (28 percent DV)
100 grams: 15 mg (100 percent DV)

4. Pine Nuts—18 percent DV per serving

1 ounce: 2.7 mg (18 percent DV)
100 grams: 9.3 mg (62 percent DV)

5. Peanuts—16 percent DV per serving

1 ounce: 2.4 mg (16 percent DV)
100 grams: 8.3 mg (56 percent DV)

6. Brazil Nuts—11 percent DV per serving

1 ounce: 1.6 mg (11 percent DV)
100 grams: 5.7 mg (38 percent DV)

7. Pistachios—5 percent DV per serving

1 ounce: 0.8 mg (5 percent DV)
100 grams: 2.9 mg (19 percent DV)

8. Pumpkin Seeds—4 percent DV per serving

1 ounce: 0.6 mg (4 percent DV)
100 grams: 2.2 mg (15 percent DV)

9. Pecans—3 percent DV per serving

1 ounce: 0.4 mg (3 percent DV)
100 grams: 1.4 mg (9 percent DV)

10. Cashew Nuts—2 percent DV per serving

1 ounce: 0.3 mg (2 percent DV)
100 grams: 0.9 mg (6 percent DV)

10 Fruits High in Vitamin E

While fruits are generally not the best sources of vitamin E, many provide good amounts. Fruits are also rich in vitamin C, which cooperates with vitamin E as an antioxidant (2, 3).

1. Mamey Sapote—39 percent DV per serving

Half a fruit: 5.9 mg (39 percent DV)
100 grams: 2.1 mg (14 percent DV)

2. Avocado—14 percent DV per serving

Half a fruit: 2.1 mg (14 percent DV)
100 grams: 2.1 mg (14 percent DV)

3. Mango—10 percent DV per serving

Half a fruit: 1.5 mg (10 percent DV)
100 grams: 0.9 mg (6 percent DV)

4. Kiwifruit—7 percent DV per serving

1 medium fruit: 1.0 mg (7 percent DV)
100 grams: 1.5 mg (10 percent DV)

5. Blackberries—6 percent DV per serving

Half a cup: 0.8 mg (6 percent DV)
100 grams: 1.2 mg (8 percent DV)

6. Black Currants—4 percent DV per serving

Half a cup: 0.6 mg (4 percent DV)
100 grams: 1.0 mg (7 percent DV)

7. Cranberries (dried)—4 percent DV per serving

1 ounce: 0.6 mg (4 percent DV)
100 grams: 2.1 mg (14 percent DV)

8. Olives (pickled)—3 percent DV per serving

5 pieces: 0.5 mg (3 percent DV)
100 grams: 3.8 mg (25 percent DV)

9. Apricots—2 percent DV per serving

1 medium fruit: 0.3 mg (2 percent DV)
100 grams: 0.9 mg (6 percent DV)

10. Raspberries—1 percent DV per serving

10 pieces: 0.2 mg (1 percent DV)
100 grams: 0.9 mg (6 percent DV)

10 Vegetables High in Vitamin E

Like fruits, many vegetables are decent sources of vitamin E, but do not provide nearly as much as nuts and seeds.

1. Red Sweet Pepper (raw)—13 percent DV per serving

1 medium pepper: 1.9 mg (13 percent DV)
100 grams: 1.6 mg (11 percent DV)

2. Turnip Greens (raw)—10 percent DV per serving

1 cup: 1.6 mg (10 percent DV)
100 grams: 2.9 mg (19 percent DV)

3. Beet Greens (cooked)—9 percent DV per serving

Half a cup: 1.3 mg (9 percent DV)
100 grams: 1.8 mg (12 percent DV)

4. Butternut Squash (cooked)—9 percent DV per serving

Half a cup: 1.3 mg (9 percent DV)
100 grams: 1.3 mg (9 percent DV)

5. Broccoli (cooked)—8 percent DV per serving

Half a cup: 1.1 mg (8 percent DV)
100 grams: 1.5 mg (10 percent DV)

6. Mustard Greens (cooked)—8 percent DV per serving

Half a cup: 1.3 mg (8 percent DV)
100 grams: 1.8 mg (12 percent DV)

7. Asparagus (cooked)—6 percent DV per serving

4 spears: 0.9 mg (6 percent DV)
100 grams: 1.5 mg (10 percent DV)

8. Swiss Chard (raw)—6 percent DV per serving

1 leaf: 0.9 mg (6 percent DV)
100 grams: 1.9 mg (13 percent DV)

9. Collards (raw)—5 percent DV per serving

1 cup: 0.8 mg (5 percent DV)
100 grams: 2.3 mg (15 percent DV)

10. Spinach (raw)—4 percent DV per serving

1 cup: 0.6 mg (4 percent DV)
100 grams: 2.0 mg (14 percent DV)

10 Cooking Oils High in Vitamin E

The richest sources of vitamin E are cooking oils, especially wheat germ oil. Just one tablespoon of wheat germ oil may provide around 135 percent of the DV.

1. Wheat Germ Oil—135 percent DV per serving

1 tablespoon: 20 mg (135 percent DV)
100 grams: 149 mg (996 percent DV)

2. Hazelnut Oil—43 percent DV per serving

1 tablespoon: 6.4 mg (43 percent DV)
100 grams: 47 mg (315 percent DV)

3. Sunflower Oil—37 percent DV per serving

1 tablespoon: 5.6 mg (37 percent DV)
100 grams: 41 mg (274 percent DV)

4. Almond Oil—36 percent DV per serving

1 tablespoon: 5.3 mg (36 percent DV)
100 grams: 39 mg (261 percent DV)

5. Cottonseed Oil—32 percent DV per serving

1 tablespoon: 4.8 mg (32 percent DV)
100 grams: 35 mg (235 percent DV)

6. Safflower Oil—31 percent DV per serving

1 tablespoon: 4.6 mg (31 percent DV)
100 grams: 34 mg (227 percent DV)

7. Rice Bran Oil—29 percent DV per serving

1 tablespoon: 4.4 mg (29 percent DV)
100 grams: 32 mg (215 percent DV)

8. Grapeseed Oil—26 percent DV per serving

1 tablespoon: 3.9 mg (26 percent DV)
100 grams: 29 mg (192 percent DV)

9. Canola Oil—16 percent DV per serving

1 tablespoon: 2.4 mg (16 percent DV)
100 grams: 18 mg (116 percent DV)

10. Palm Oil—14 percent DV per serving

1 tablespoon: 2.2 mg (14 percent DV)
100 grams: 16 mg (106 percent DV)

How Can You Get Enough Vitamin E?

Vitamin E is found in nearly all foods to some extent. For this reason, most people are not at risk of deficiency.

Yet, disorders that affect the absorption of fat, such as cystic fibrosis or liver disease, may lead to deficiency over time, especially if your diet is low in vitamin E (4).

Increasing your vitamin E intake is easy, even without supplements. For instance, an excellent strategy would be to add some sunflower seeds or almonds to your diet.

You can also increase the absorption of vitamin E from low-fat foods by eating them with fat. Adding a tablespoon of oil to your salad could make a significant difference.

Reposted with permission from our media associate Authority Nutrition.

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