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5 Best Foods for Your Skin—and the 5 Worst

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By Robin Scher

Aging is an inevitable part of life. That doesn't mean it's something to fear. Instead, the natural process our body and skin undergoes as we get older deserves our acknowledgment and our respect. How can you respect the aging process? One great way is to start thinking more about what you eat.


"We're actually learning that poor nutrition is just as bad for your skin as cigarette smoking," Patricia Farris, a dermatologist and author of The Sugar Detox, explained to health website Prevention.com. The reasons for this are multiple and relate to both short- and long-term effects.

Certain foods are crucial to keeping your skin hydrated while other foods can directly help protect your skin cells from damage that can lead to wrinkles.

"Every dermatologist will attest that a well-rounded diet will better support a healthy immune system," said Bobby Buka, a New York City dermatologist "and will therefore result in fewer dermatologic conditions of all types."

By eating the right foods and avoiding the wrong ones, you may not be able to turn back the hands of time, but you can certainly slow down some of the cogs.

Here are five foods that will have you looking more youthful long into your golden years:

1. Olive Oil

You've probably heard that olive oil is great for your heart, but did you know it's also super for your skin? A 2012 PLOS ONE study reflected this after analyzing the diets of 1,264 women. The study found that women who consumed more than 2 teaspoons of olive oil a day experienced "31 percent fewer signs of aging compared to people who ate less than 3.8 grams (about 1 teaspoon)." Olive oil in particular was responsible for this difference due to the fact that around "75 percent of the fat in olive oil is monounsaturated fatty acids."

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