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Sushi, Salads, Spring Rolls Recalled by Trader Joe’s, Giant Eagle and Other Retailers

Food

A number of supermarkets across the country have voluntarily issued a recall on sushi, salads and spring rolls distributed by Fuji Food Products due to a possible listeria contamination, as CBS News reported.


The recalled products are sold in 31 states and Washington, DC across the East Coast, the South, and the Midwest, at retailers and distributors including Trader Joe's, 7-Eleven, Walgreens, Food Lion, Hannaford, Giant Eagle, Porky Products, Bozzuto's, Supreme Lobster and Superior Foods, according to CBS News.

The tainted food was discovered during a routine Food and Drug Administration (FDA) inspection of a facility in Brockton, Massachusetts. Fuji Food has never needed to recall its products before, but acted swiftly and immediately ceased production and distribution of its products in Brockton, according to an FDA statement.

"As responsible processors of safe, fresh food for nearly 30 years, we are addressing this problem vigorously and we apologize to those who are affected by it,"" said Fuji Food Products CEO Farrell Hirsch, in the FDA statement. "We will restart operation only after we have eliminated the cause and the FDA certifies that our facility is once again free of possible contamination."

The pathogenic bacteria Listeria monocytogenes can cause serious infections and can be fatal, particularly for young children, the elderly, and people with compromised immune systems. Nearly 1,600 people in the US become seriously ill from listeria every year. About 16 percent of the cases are fatal, according to CNN.

Exposure to listeria can trigger miscarriages and stillbirths in pregnant women. Healthy, able-bodied teens and adults usually have fever, headaches, nausea, stomach pain, and diarrhea, according to the Centers for Disease Control, as USA Today reported.

For Trader Joe's customers, all of the potentially tainted products are packaged in plastic trays with clear lids. Trader Joe's urges anyone who bought any of its recalled products to throw them out or return them to any of its stores for an immediate refund. The recalled products, as CNN reported, include California Rolls, Classic California Rolls with Brown Rice & Avocado, Spicy California Rolls, Tempura Shrimp Crunch Rolls, Tofu Spring Rolls, Shrimp Spring Rolls, Smoked Salmon Philly Roll, Smoked Salmon Poke Bowl, Banh Mi Inspired Noodle Bowl and the Queso Fundido Spicy Cheese Dip.

In addition to Trader Joe's own line, 13 varieties of Okami sushi rolls and salads were distributed to brand name retailers in Alabama, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Vermont, Virginia, Washington DC, West Virginia, and Wisconsin, as CNN reported.

The FDA said consumers should return any item from the following list of products, UPC codes, and sell by dates printed on the package.

  • Okami 8-piece California Roll: 7-32869-28101-5, 11/22-12/06/2019
  • Okami 8-piece Spicy California Roll: 7-32869-28102-2, 11/22-12/06/2019
  • Okami 8-piece Supreme California Roll: 7-32869-28103-9, 11/22-12/06/2019
  • Okami 8-piece Spicy Supreme California Roll: 7-32869-28104-6, 11/22-12/06/2019
  • Okami 8-piece Classic California Roll with SO: 7-32869-28105-3, 11/22-12/06/2019
  • Okami 8-piece Supreme Combo: 7-32869-28111-4, 11/22-12/06/2019
  • Okami 8-piece Supreme Sampler: 7-32869-28112-1, 11/22-12/06/2019
  • Okami 8-piece Brown Rice Classic California Roll: 7-32869-28122-0, 11/22-12/06/2019
  • Okami 25-piece Sushi Platter: 7-32869-28200-5, 11/22-12/06/2019
  • Okami 6pcs Sushi Platter: 7-32869-28201-2, 11/22-12/06/2019
  • Okami 8-piece Seafood Combo: 7-32869-28262-3, 11/22-12/06/2019
  • Okami Tempura Shrimp Roll 6-piece: 7-32869-28114-5, 11/22-12/06/2019
  • Okami 8-pieces Salmon Philly Roll: 7-32869-28113-8, 11/22-12/06/2019
  • Trader Joe's Smoked Salmon Poke Bowl: 603751, 11/20-12/04/2019
  • Trader Joe's Banh Mi Style Salad: 614719, 11/19-12/03/2019
  • Trader Joe's Shrimp Spring Rolls 7 oz: 908795, 11/18-12/02/2019
  • Trader Joe's Tofu Spring Rolls 7 oz: 921510, 11/18-12/02/2019
  • Trader Joe's Queso Fundido 16 oz: 646574, 12/10-12/24/2019
  • Trader Joe's 8-piece Spicy Cal Roll 8 oz: 348966,11/22-12/06/2019
  • Trader Joe's 8-piece California Roll 8 oz: 348997, 11/22-12/06/2019
  • Trader Joe's 8-piece Tempura Shrimp Crunch Rolls 8.5 oz: 513289, 11/22-12/06/2019
  • Trader Joe's 8-piece Smoked Salmon Philly Roll: 603775 11/20-12/04/2019
  • Trader Joe's 8-piece Brown Rice California Roll 8 oz: 909822, 11/22-12/06/2019

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