Irma Omerhodzic

6 Podcasts You Can Sink Your Teeth Into

By Samantha Henry

We can probably all agree that 2017 brought its share of ups and downs for the food movement. But thankfully, there are podcasts to help us get through it!

This year, podcasts became a trendy way to give audiences a new way to learn, be entertained and stay abreast of the news. Chances are you've started listening to some, too.

Here's a list of food and agriculture podcasts we've been listening to that provide insight, humor and thought-provoking food and farming facts.

1. Bite

Acclaimed Mother Jones food and farming blogger Tom Philpott, and editors Kiera Butler and Maddie Oatman are serving up "a podcast for people who think hard about their food." Bite has covered a range of topics such as the controversial Impossible Burger, migrant rights within the restaurant industry, and small farmers' rights in the midst of the challenging Trump administration, just to name a few. Check out the If You Are Buying Pumpkin Spice Protein Powder, You Should Just Give Up episode that pokes fun at the pumpkin spice sensory overload that we have all experienced in recent fall seasons.

2. Real Food Reads

Hosted by Anna Lappé, an important author and food expert herself, this podcast focuses on book reviews and conversations with authors who delve into subjects such as activism, practical food waste solutions, and the use of antibiotics within the fast food industry. Tuning into this podcast is a great way to learn and get new insight into these topics while also getting new titles to add to your "Want to Read" list on Goodreads. Take a listen to the episode where Anna interviews author Carey Gillam on her book, WHITEWASH: The Story of a Weed Killer, Cancer, and the Corruption of Science, on the deception in the way science has been handled around the herbicide glyphosate.

3. The Racist Sandwich

Want a podcast that cultivates conversation around current issues in the food industry, and how they often intersect with politics, race, class and gender? This one is for you. Hosts Soleil Ho, Zahir Janmohamed and Juan Diego Ramirez have candid conversations with activists, restaurateurs and food writers about the ins and outs of their experiences in their respective workplaces and spaces. Check out a Bonus Episode from this past August Waking up from the Dream that discusses the potential impacts ending the DACA program would have on undocumented farm workers.

4. The Female Farmer Project

Writer and photographer Audra Mulkem started the project as a multi-platform documentary that chronicles female farmers globally. Since we love podcasts, we are thrilled the project includes one! It aims to serve as a platform for women to discuss agricultural issues and give power to their knowledge. In the most recent episode, Stacey Gose discusses her frustration with the lack of farm-appropriate clothing for women despite being the fastest growing group of farmers. She is a former Iowa farm kid and founder of the women's workwear brand TOUGHER. "Women have been getting it done before Rosie the Riveter came around," said Gose. Amen!

5. Gastropod

Through fascinating stories with food experts, on field visits and at archeological digs, co-hosts Cynthia Graber and Nicola Twilley look at food through the lens of science and history. They discuss attention-grabbing topics and take us on a journey into our food we never knew we needed or wanted to go on. We recommend The Birds and the Bugs where Maryn McKenna tells the tale of chickens and the chicken industry in her new book Big Chicken.

6. Earth Eats

Producer Kayte Young and Chef Daniel Orr deliver a fresh episode every week. Based out of Indiana, its contributors provide intricate looks into local happenings, interviewing celebrity experts like Alton Brown. Spotlights are given to recipes that include sustainable ingredients, federal and local food and environmental policy, and food safety tips.

What food and agriculture podcasts are you listening to? Let us know!

Pro-tip: You can listen to more and more of them if you increase the speed to 1.5x!

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