Quantcast
Food
Irma Omerhodzic

6 Podcasts You Can Sink Your Teeth Into

By Samantha Henry

We can probably all agree that 2017 brought its share of ups and downs for the food movement. But thankfully, there are podcasts to help us get through it!

This year, podcasts became a trendy way to give audiences a new way to learn, be entertained and stay abreast of the news. Chances are you've started listening to some, too.


Here's a list of food and agriculture podcasts we've been listening to that provide insight, humor and thought-provoking food and farming facts.

1. Bite

Acclaimed Mother Jones food and farming blogger Tom Philpott, and editors Kiera Butler and Maddie Oatman are serving up "a podcast for people who think hard about their food." Bite has covered a range of topics such as the controversial Impossible Burger, migrant rights within the restaurant industry, and small farmers' rights in the midst of the challenging Trump administration, just to name a few. Check out the If You Are Buying Pumpkin Spice Protein Powder, You Should Just Give Up episode that pokes fun at the pumpkin spice sensory overload that we have all experienced in recent fall seasons.

2. Real Food Reads

Hosted by Anna Lappé, an important author and food expert herself, this podcast focuses on book reviews and conversations with authors who delve into subjects such as activism, practical food waste solutions, and the use of antibiotics within the fast food industry. Tuning into this podcast is a great way to learn and get new insight into these topics while also getting new titles to add to your "Want to Read" list on Goodreads. Take a listen to the episode where Anna interviews author Carey Gillam on her book, WHITEWASH: The Story of a Weed Killer, Cancer, and the Corruption of Science, on the deception in the way science has been handled around the herbicide glyphosate.

3. The Racist Sandwich

Want a podcast that cultivates conversation around current issues in the food industry, and how they often intersect with politics, race, class and gender? This one is for you. Hosts Soleil Ho, Zahir Janmohamed and Juan Diego Ramirez have candid conversations with activists, restaurateurs and food writers about the ins and outs of their experiences in their respective workplaces and spaces. Check out a Bonus Episode from this past August Waking up from the Dream that discusses the potential impacts ending the DACA program would have on undocumented farm workers.

4. The Female Farmer Project

Writer and photographer Audra Mulkem started the project as a multi-platform documentary that chronicles female farmers globally. Since we love podcasts, we are thrilled the project includes one! It aims to serve as a platform for women to discuss agricultural issues and give power to their knowledge. In the most recent episode, Stacey Gose discusses her frustration with the lack of farm-appropriate clothing for women despite being the fastest growing group of farmers. She is a former Iowa farm kid and founder of the women's workwear brand TOUGHER. "Women have been getting it done before Rosie the Riveter came around," said Gose. Amen!

5. Gastropod

Through fascinating stories with food experts, on field visits and at archeological digs, co-hosts Cynthia Graber and Nicola Twilley look at food through the lens of science and history. They discuss attention-grabbing topics and take us on a journey into our food we never knew we needed or wanted to go on. We recommend The Birds and the Bugs where Maryn McKenna tells the tale of chickens and the chicken industry in her new book Big Chicken.

6. Earth Eats

Producer Kayte Young and Chef Daniel Orr deliver a fresh episode every week. Based out of Indiana, its contributors provide intricate looks into local happenings, interviewing celebrity experts like Alton Brown. Spotlights are given to recipes that include sustainable ingredients, federal and local food and environmental policy, and food safety tips.

What food and agriculture podcasts are you listening to? Let us know!

Pro-tip: You can listen to more and more of them if you increase the speed to 1.5x!

Show Comments ()

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Sponsored
Climate
350 .org / Flickr / CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

Taking Your First Steps Into Local Climate Action

Yes, yes—it can feel daunting. The climate crisis is more urgent than it's ever been. Some days we feel like we're making good progress, when we hear of countries powered by 100 percent renewable energy or a big commitment to take on fossil fuel corporations from a city like New York. But other days, it's a heavy burden knowing there's so much more that needs to be done to unseat the fossil fuel industry and move to a just, Fossil Free, renewably-powered world.

Keep reading... Show less
Food

'Eating Animals' Drives Home Where Our Food Really Comes From

It started with a call from actress and animal rights activist Natalie Portman to author Jonathan Safran Foer. The latter had recently taken a break from novel-writing to publish 2009's New York Times best-selling treatise Eating Animals—an in-depth discussion of what it means to eat animals in an industrialized world, with all attendant environmental and ethical concerns. The two planned a meeting in Foer's Brooklyn backyard, and also invited documentary director Christopher Dillon Quinn (God Grew Tired of Us) over. The idea was to figure out how to turn Foer's sprawling, memoiristic book into a documentary that would ignite mainstream conversations around our food systems.

Keep reading... Show less
Food

A Ghanaian Chef Feeding His Country and Combating Food Waste

Ghanaian chef Elijah Amoo Addo is on a mission to feed his nation on the excesses the food industry creates. Since 2012, he has been collecting unwanted stock or food nearing its use-by date from suppliers, farmers and restaurants in Ghana to redistribute to orphanages, hospitals, schools and vulnerable communities through his not-for-profit organization Food for All Africa. They provide meals through a Share Your Breakfast program in addition to donating stock to be used later. The organization supports and encourages communities to farm and works with stakeholders within Ghana's food industry on ways to combat waste.

Keep reading... Show less
Animals
Tucuxi Amazon river dolphins (Sotalia fluviatilis). Projeto Boto

Hunting, Fishing Cause Dramatic Decline in Amazon River Dolphins

By Claire Asher

Populations of two species of river dolphin in the Amazon are halving every decade, according to the results of a twenty-two year survey.

The Amazon rainforest is home to the Amazon river dolphin, or Boto (Inia geoffrensis) and the Tucuxi (Sotalia fluviatilis). But the results of a long-term study published in PLoS ONE show that both of these once abundant aquatic mammals are now in rapid decline in the Brazilian Amazon, likely due to hunting and fishing.

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored
Energy

'Historic First': Nebraska Farmers Return Land to Ponca Tribe in Effort to Block Keystone XL

By Jessica Corbett

In a move that could challenge the proposed path of TransCanada's Keystone XL pipeline—and acknowledges the U.S. government's long history of abusing Native Americans and forcing them off their lands—a Nebraska farm couple has returned a portion of ancestral land to the Ponca Tribe.

Keep reading... Show less
Business

Sustainable Fashion Innovator Makes Fiber From Pineapple Leaves

In 1960, 97 percent of the fibers used in clothing came from natural materials. Today that number has fallen to 35 percent. But sustainable fashion veteran Isaac Nichelson wants to reverse that trend.

His company, Circular Systems S.P.C. (Social Purpose Corp.), has developed an innovative technology for turning food waste into thread, according to a Fast Company profile published Friday.

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored
Politics
EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt at the U.S. House Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Environment on April 26. EPA / YouTube

Chair of Senate Environment Panel to Call Scott Pruitt to Testify on Scandals

The Republican chairman of the Senate committee with oversight of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) plans to call the agency's embattled chief Scott Pruitt to testify, specifically in response to multiple scandals and investigations surrounding the administrator.

Through a spokesperson, Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., informed Reuters of his decision to compel Pruitt to come before the Environment and Public Works Committee to answer questions about his alleged abuse of his office.

Keep reading... Show less
Politics
Pexels

Senate’s Farm Bill Moves Forward—But What Is It, Anyway?

By Shannan Lenke Stoll

The Senate Agriculture Committee just passed its version of a farm bill in a 20-1 vote Thursday. It's one more step in what has been a delayed journey to pass a 2018–2022 bill before the current one expires in September.

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored

mail-copy

The best of EcoWatch, right in your inbox. Sign up for our email newsletter!