Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Food Industry’s Switch to Non-BPA Linings Still Poses Health Risks

Health + Wellness
Research indicates that common BPA replacements may pose many of the same health effects as the original chemical. Getty Images

By George Citroner

Bisphenol A (BPA) is well-known for its estrogen-mimicking properties (Trusted Source), and is used in many canned foods. While manufacturers have been removing this compound from their products, new research is showing that the substitute might be just as bad.


Bisphenol S (BPS) and bisphenol F (BPF) are manufactured chemicals now being used to replace the BPA in plastics lining aluminum cans and items like cash-register receipts.

But, according to a study published in the Journal of the Endocrine Society, these two substances are also linked with an increased likelihood of childhood obesity.

Children With Higher Levels Are More Likely to Be Obese

Researchers analyzed data from the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (Trusted Source) to evaluate associations between BPA, BPS, and BPF, and body mass outcomes among children ages 6 to 19.

They found children with higher levels of BPS and BPF in their urine were more likely to be obese compared to those with lower levels.

Asked if she found the findings surprising, study author Melanie Jacobson, PhD, MPH, of NYU School of Medicine, told Healthline, "Unfortunately not. BPF and BPS have almost the same chemical structure as BPA, so we might expect that they could act similarly in the body."

"Previous research has shown similar findings in both children and adults. For example, in a previous study, we found that BPA was associated with a higher prevalence of obesity in U.S. children, and this study found the same trend among these newer versions of that chemical," said Jacobson.

Bisphenol Disrupts the Body’s Metabolism

BPA had already been identified as an obesogen in a 2017 study (Trusted Source).

"An obesogen is a substance that disrupts the endocrine system and the body's metabolism such that it promotes fat accumulation, weight gain, and obesity," Dr. Nagendra Gupta, internist at Texas Health Arlington Memorial, explained.

He continued: "It actually belongs to a class of chemicals, which are known as endocrine disruptors. These chemicals look like and act like hormones, thus confusing the human endocrine system and causing disruption of its normal functions, resulting in a variety of effects, some of which can be harmful."

Exposure to These Chemicals Is Common

"Our study was about exposure to bisphenols, which are synthetic chemicals found in aluminum can linings, plastics, thermal paper receipts, and other consumer products, and their association with obesity among a nationally representative sample of U.S. children and adolescents," said Jacobson.

"We found that children who had greater levels of these chemicals in their urine were more likely to be obese compared with children with lower levels," she said.

"We conducted this study because exposure to these chemicals is very common in the U.S.," she continued. "Bisphenol S and bisphenol F are replacement chemicals for bisphenol A, which has been decreasing in use in recent years due to concern over potential health effects."

"These compounds basically mimic the effects of some hormones such as estrogen and glucocorticoids, which play an important role in metabolism of fat and reproductive health," Gupta said.

Bisphenol’s Are Recognized as Safe By Old FDA Rule

Some chemicals used in the process of packaging or preparing foods, like bisphenol, fall under a U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) rule called Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS).

This means that substances added to food must be FDA-reviewed unless the substance is "generally recognized, among qualified experts, as having been adequately shown to be safe under the conditions of its intended use."

The American Academy of Pediatrics said in a policy statement that many of these substances were grandfathered for approval because they were considered GRAS during the 1950s. However, this doesn't consider the impact of chemicals that can be absorbed into food indirectly, such as through dyes or packaging.

The Academy also said "the GRAS process, although intended to be used in limited situations, has become the process by which virtually all new food additives enter the market. Consequently, neither the FDA nor the public have adequate notice or review."

Responding to growing concerns over bisphenol and other chemicals, then-FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb and FDA Deputy Commissioner Anna Abram said in a 2018 statement (Trusted Source): "Food safety is at the core of the agency's mission to protect and promote public health for our nation's consumers. We take seriously our commitment to the consumers and industry who look to the FDA for important guidance when it comes to our nation's food supply, including the safety of substances used in food."

Minimizing Your Exposure to Bisphenols

According to Jacobson, some manufacturers are using naturally-based can liners, such as oleoresin.

"However, without a clear label to differentiate bisphenol from non-bisphenol linings, parents can minimize children's exposure by reducing consumption of processed foods such as canned foods, avoiding thermal paper receipts, and not microwaving polycarbonate plastic food containers."

She cautioned, "Although our study did not examine pregnant women, avoiding exposure to these chemicals is advised given the vulnerability of the fetus to any chemical exposures."

"These chemicals can be present in basically anything. Besides plastics and aluminum cans, BPS is found on a variety of surfaces, such as documents generated from a thermal printer. Likewise, many skin lotions are packaged in plastic bottles that might result in exposure to bisphenol compounds," explained Gupta.

"Given the labeling restrictions confined only to BPA as of now, it is very hard for people to screen for the presence of BPS and BPF in plastics," he said.

Reposted with permission from our media associate Healthline.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

U.S. Vice President Joe Biden speaks during a White House Clean Energy Investment Summit on June 16, 2015 in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building in Washington, DC. Alex Wong / Getty Images

By Jake Johnson

With presumptive Democratic nominee Joe Biden's climate platform becoming increasingly ambitious thanks to nonstop grassroots pressure, fossil fuel executives and lobbyists are pouring money into the coffers of President Donald Trump's reelection campaign in the hopes of keeping an outspoken and dedicated ally of dirty energy in the White House.

Read More Show Less
The Food and Drug Administration is now warning against more than 100 potentially dangerous hand sanitizers.
Antonio_Diaz / Getty Images

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is now warning against more than 100 potentially dangerous hand sanitizers.

Read More Show Less
New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks at a news conference on July 1, 2020 in New York City. Byron Smith / Getty Images

While the nation overall struggles with rising COVID cases, New York State is seeing the opposite. After peaking in March and April and implementing strict shutdowns of businesses, the state has seen its number of positive cases steadily decline as it slowly reopens. From coast-to-coast, Governor Andrew Cuomo's response to the crisis has been hailed as an exemplar of how to handle a public health crisis.

Read More Show Less
A whale shark swims in the Egyptian Red Sea. Derek Keats / Wikimedia Commons / CC by 2.0

By Gavin Naylor

Sharks elicit outsized fear, even though the risk of a shark bite is infinitesimally small. As a marine biologist and director of the Florida Program for Shark Research, I oversee the International Shark Attack File – a global record of reported shark bites that has been maintained continuously since 1958.

Read More Show Less
A girl sits under a temporary shade made by joining two bed in Churu, Rajasthan on June 4, 2019. Temperatures in the Indian desert city hit 50 degrees C (122 F) for the second time in three days, sending residents scrambling for shade. MONEY SHARMA / AFP via Getty Images

Current efforts to curb an infectious disease show the potential we have for collective action. That action and more will be needed if we want to stem the coming wave of heat-related deaths that will surpass the number of people who die from all infectious diseases, according to a new study, as The Guardian reported.

Read More Show Less
America Pikas are found from the Sierra Nevada to the Rocky Mountains, and have been migrating to higher elevations. Jon LeVasseur / Flickr / Public Domain

By Jenny Morber

Caribbean corals sprout off Texas. Pacific salmon tour the Canadian Arctic. Peruvian lowland birds nest at higher elevations.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Biologists are studying the impact of climate change on the Nenets and their reindeer herds. Deutsche Welle

Biologist Egor Kirillin is on a special mission. Deep in the Siberian wilderness in the Russian Republic of Sakha, he waits on the Olenjok river until reindeer come thundering into the water.

Read More Show Less